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November 7, 2019
Christina Markert Profile Picture
Christina Markert: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
University of Texas at Austin professor Christina Markert is investigating the nuclear evolution of the universe.
November 6, 2019
Drexel researchers have developed a way to coat cellulose yarn with flakes of a type of conductive, two-dimensional material, called MXene, to imbue it with the conductivity and durability it needs to be knit into functional fabrics.
That New Yarn?! — Wearable, Washable Textile Devices Are Possible With MXene-Coated Yarns
Drexel researchers have developed a way to coat cellulose yarn with flakes of a type of conductive, two-dimensional material called MXene.
November 4, 2019
Graduate student Jennifer Lee uses a large transmission electron microscope, housed in the Singh Center, to take a closer look at the nanomaterials and nanocrystals that are synthesized in the lab.
Researchers Think Small to Make Progress Toward Better Fuel Cells
A collaborative study describes how fuel cells can be developed using nanomaterials to be more cost-effective and efficient in the long term.
November 1, 2019
Christiane Jablonowski Profile Picture
Christiane Jablonowski: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Her EC award supported work to develop climate circulation models with state-of-the-art techniques for resolving multiple scales.
October 30, 2019
Rubbery segments in a ribbon-shaped polymer membrane make it super-stretchy. It also has the ability to heal itself after a cut or break.
Stitching It All Together
Scientists are working to develop materials that can reinforce or heal themselves, just like their biological counterparts.
October 29, 2019
The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument
DESI Opens Its 5,000 Eyes to Capture the Colors of the Cosmos
With installation near completion, new sky-surveying instrument begins final testing.
October 28, 2019
Researchers have developed a tiny nanolaser that can function inside of living tissues without harming them.
Tiny, Biocompatible Nanolaser Could Function Inside Living Tissues
Nanolaser has potential to treat neurological disorders or sense disease biomarkers.
October 25, 2019
Christine M. Thomas Profile Picture
Christine M. Thomas: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
The Ohio State University chemistry professor Christine M. Thomas designs catalysts to make fuels more energy efficient and environmentally benign.
October 23, 2019
Different colored fluorescent labels allow the researchers to track which fiber type is attached to which bead.
For Gut Microbes, Not All Types of Fiber Are Created Equal
Beneficial microbes pursue certain types of dietary fiber, findings that could aid design of foods.
October 22, 2019
Director Douglas Mans stands in front of EMSL’s wall of flags representing its staff and users from around the world.
Meet the Director: Douglas Mans, EMSL
Director Douglas Mans enjoys the challenges of leading EMSL while developing partnerships with industries, academia, and government agencies.
October 18, 2019
Feng Wang: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Feng Wang: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Wang’s 2010 Early Career Award supported his research on graphene using advanced device fabrication, electrical control, and laser spectroscopy.
October 17, 2019
An illustration imagining the molecular machinery inside microbes as technology.
Unlocking the Biochemical Treasure Chest Within Microbes
A new genetic engineering tool will help open the floodgates of microbial metabolite applications.
October 15, 2019
The Nobel Prize Logo
Charging Up the Development of Lithium-Ion Batteries
The Office of Science is proud to have supported work by two of the latest Nobel laureates in chemistry.
October 9, 2019
Working together, the NEES team has made notable discoveries about nanoscale electrochemistry and architectural design of energy storage materials.
The Hidden Architecture of Energy Storage
Working together, the NEES team has made notable discoveries about nanoscale electrochemistry and architectural design of energy storage materials.
October 9, 2019
Adding water to a sample of inactive lithium.
Study Identifies Main Culprit Behind Lithium Metal Battery Failure
A research team led by the University of California San Diego has discovered the root cause of why lithium metal batteries fail.
October 9, 2019
Comparison of the visible manuscript page (top) and the X-ray fluorescence image (bottom) of the Syriac Galen Palimpsest.  The horizontal text in pale red (bottom image) is the original Galen text.
Fossils and Folios
How the same technique helped reveal both a 6th century medical text and an ancient bird feather’s pigment.
October 9, 2019
Argonne physicist Mahalingam Balasubramanian loads an in situ lithium-ion battery into the low-energy resolution inelastic X-ray (LERIX) system at the Advanced Photon Source.
Peering Into Batteries: X-Rays Reveal Lithium-Ion’s Mysteries
Researchers are using the Office of Science’s advanced light sources to study batteries in real-time.
October 8, 2019
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Registration Now Open for Energy Department’s National Science Bowl®
High school & middle school teams nationwide can now sign up to compete in one of the nation’s most prestigious & largest academic science competition
October 4, 2019
Early Career Award Winner Pavel Nadolsky Profile Picture
Pavel Nadolsky: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Nadolsky is creating state-of-the-art methods in order to learn about elementary particles’ properties.
October 3, 2019
Bacteria help drive the natural decay of plant material using small sulfur compounds called thiols.
Scientists Mimic Natural Decay to Break Down Plant Material for Biofuel Production
Researchers have mimicked a bacterial pathway to break down the toughest parts of a plant in preparation for biofuel processing.
October 1, 2019
A new study proposes a new biochemical pathway by which the microorganism Methanosarcina acetivorans uses iron to more efficiently conserve energy when producing the greenhouse gasses methane and carbon dioxide.
Methane-Producing Microorganism Makes a Meal of Iron
Manipulating iron could alter production of this greenhouse gas.
September 27, 2019
Xiaochao Zheng Profile Picture
Xiaochao Zheng: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Her Early Career Award funding supported Zheng and her team in parity measurement research.
September 23, 2019
In the Arctic, sea ice extent today is less than half of what it was in 1984. Photo is courtesy of the Alfred Wegener Institute.
For the Arctic, an Epic Investigation
Embedded in sea ice for a year, a shipborne observatory will take a rare look at conditions in the rapidly evolving central Arctic.
September 20, 2019
Michelle Strout Profile Picture
Michelle Strout: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Strout’s ECA supports the SAIMI project, creating small programming models to increase performance.
September 18, 2019
Through a $2.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, a University of Nebraska–Lincoln research team is developing ways to maximize sorghum potentials across the United States.
Nebraska Team Merges Machine Learning, Plant Genetics to Maximize Sorghum Potential
Project is among the first to unite artificial intelligence and plant science.