Fact #935: July 25, 2016 By Volume, Net Petroleum Imports are at Lowest Point Since 1985

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Until recently, the petroleum imported into the United States (net imports) followed a similar trend to the petroleum consumed. However, from 2013 to 2015 the consumption of petroleum rose each year while petroleum imports declined. Net imports of petroleum were about 4.7 million barrels per day (mmbd) in 2015 which was more than 60% lower than the peak in 2005. The last year in which net imports were lower than 5 mmbd was 1985. The 2015 share of net imports to petroleum consumption also declined to the lowest point since 1971.

U.S. Petroleum Consumption, Net Imports, and Share of Net Imports to Petroleum Consumption, 1950-2015

Graph showing U.S. petroleum consumption, net imports, and share of net imports to petroleum consumption from 1950 to 2015.

Note: Net imports are total imports minus exports.

Fact #935 Dataset

Supporting Information

U.S. Petroleum Consumption, Net Imports, and Share of Net Imports to Petroleum Consumption, 1950-2015
Year Net Imports of Petroleum (mmbd) Petroleum Consumption (mmbd) Share of Net Imports to Petroleum Consumption
1950 0.55 6.46 8%
1951 0.42 7.02 6%
1952 0.52 7.27 7%
1953 0.63 7.60 8%
1954 0.70 7.76 9%
1955 0.88 8.46 10%
1956 1.01 8.78 11%
1957 1.01 8.81 11%
1958 1.42 9.12 16%
1959 1.57 9.53 16%
1960 1.61 9.80 16%
1961 1.74 9.98 17%
1962 1.91 10.40 18%
1963 1.91 10.74 18%
1964 2.06 11.02 19%
1965 2.28 11.51 20%
1966 2.37 12.08 20%
1967 2.23 12.56 18%
1968 2.61 13.39 19%
1969 2.93 14.14 21%
1970 3.16 14.70 22%
1971 3.70 15.21 24%
1972 4.52 16.37 28%
1973 6.02 17.31 35%
1974 5.89 16.65 35%
1975 5.85 16.32 36%
1976 7.09 17.46 41%
1977 8.56 18.43 46%
1978 8.00 18.85 42%
1979 7.99 18.51 43%
1980 6.36 17.06 37%
1981 5.40 16.06 34%
1982 4.30 15.30 28%
1983 4.31 15.23 28%
1984 4.72 15.73 30%
1985 4.29 15.73 27%
1986 5.44 16.28 33%
1987 5.91 16.67 35%
1988 6.59 17.28 38%
1989 7.20 17.33 42%
1990 7.16 16.99 42%
1991 6.63 16.71 40%
1992 6.94 17.03 41%
1993 7.62 17.24 44%
1994 8.05 17.72 45%
1995 7.89 17.72 44%
1996 8.50 18.31 46%
1997 9.16 18.62 49%
1998 9.76 18.92 52%
1999 9.91 19.52 51%
2000 10.42 19.70 53%
2001 10.90 19.65 55%
2002 10.55 19.76 53%
2003 11.24 20.03 56%
2004 12.10 20.73 58%
2005 12.55 20.80 60%
2006 12.39 20.69 60%
2007 12.04 20.68 58%
2008 11.11 19.50 57%
2009 9.67 18.77 51%
2010 9.44 19.18 49%
2011 8.45 18.88 45%
2012 7.39 18.49 40%
2013 6.24 18.96 33%
2014 5.07 19.11 27%
2015 4.65 19.40 24%

Source:
Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review, April 2016, Table 3.3a.

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Until recently, the petroleum imported into the United States (net imports) followed a similar trend to the petroleum consumed. However, from 2013 to 2015 the consumption of petroleum rose each year while petroleum imports declined. Net imports of petroleum were about 4.7 million barrels per day (mmbd) in 2015 which was more than 60% lower than the peak in 2005. The last year in which net imports were lower than 5 mmbd was 1985. The 2015 share of net imports to petroleum consumption also declined to the lowest point since 1971.

U.S. Petroleum Consumption, Net Imports, and Share of Net Imports to Petroleum Consumption, 1950-2015

Graph showing U.S. petroleum consumption, net imports, and share of net imports to petroleum consumption from 1950 to 2015.

Note: Net imports are total imports minus exports.

Fact #935 Dataset

Supporting Information

U.S. Petroleum Consumption, Net Imports, and Share of Net Imports to Petroleum Consumption, 1950-2015
YearNet Imports of Petroleum (mmbd)Petroleum Consumption (mmbd)Share of Net Imports to Petroleum Consumption
19500.556.468%
19510.427.026%
19520.527.277%
19530.637.608%
19540.707.769%
19550.888.4610%
19561.018.7811%
19571.018.8111%
19581.429.1216%
19591.579.5316%
19601.619.8016%
19611.749.9817%
19621.9110.4018%
19631.9110.7418%
19642.0611.0219%
19652.2811.5120%
19662.3712.0820%
19672.2312.5618%
19682.6113.3919%
19692.9314.1421%
19703.1614.7022%
19713.7015.2124%
19724.5216.3728%
19736.0217.3135%
19745.8916.6535%
19755.8516.3236%
19767.0917.4641%
19778.5618.4346%
19788.0018.8542%
19797.9918.5143%
19806.3617.0637%
19815.4016.0634%
19824.3015.3028%
19834.3115.2328%
19844.7215.7330%
19854.2915.7327%
19865.4416.2833%
19875.9116.6735%
19886.5917.2838%
19897.2017.3342%
19907.1616.9942%
19916.6316.7140%
19926.9417.0341%
19937.6217.2444%
19948.0517.7245%
19957.8917.7244%
19968.5018.3146%
19979.1618.6249%
19989.7618.9252%
19999.9119.5251%
200010.4219.7053%
200110.9019.6555%
200210.5519.7653%
200311.2420.0356%
200412.1020.7358%
200512.5520.8060%
200612.3920.6960%
200712.0420.6858%
200811.1119.5057%
20099.6718.7751%
20109.4419.1849%
20118.4518.8845%
20127.3918.4940%
20136.2418.9633%
20145.0719.1127%
20154.6519.4024%

Source:
Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review, April 2016, Table 3.3a.

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