Video Url

View the text description of this video below.

Video courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy

Below is the text version for the video, Why Energy I-Corps. In this video, several individuals describe what the Energy I-Corps program is and how it has helped researchers and industry mentors define technology value propositions, conduct stakeholder discovery interviews, and develop viable market pathways for their technologies.

Visit the Energy I-Corps webpage to learn more about the program.

Text Version

[Upbeat music plays, a split-screen shows two videos of people interacting, followed by a blank screen and the title, "Energy I-Corps, U.S. Department of Energy."]

[Two men in suits sit side-by-side. The man on the left begins to speak. Text appears on the lower part of the screen, "Jesse Hensley, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Team CuB Fuels."]

Jesse Hensley: Energy I-Corps is a national lab-sponsored accelerator program that takes scientists through a rigorous training where they learn how to create value propositions, do customer discovery, and find a market for their technology. 

[Video cuts to a large group of people sitting around several small tables. The video then cuts to another angle of the same group listening to someone speak.]

[A woman appears on the screen and begins speaking. Text appears on the lower part of the screen, "Sally Hatcher, Instructor for Energy I-Corps, Commercialization Academy Director, University of Colorado."

Sally Hatcher: For me, I call it "How to have greater impact with your tech." 

[Video shows a large room with people sitting at long tables listening to a group of panelists. Music plays and the title "Intensive Training to Develop Viable Market Pathways for Promising Technologies" appears.]

[A man begins to speak, then appears on the screen. Text appears on the lower part of the screen, "Charlie Cooper, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Team PureBeam."]

Charlie Cooper: You get, you know, eight concentrated weeks to focus on looking at your technology, see if your technology is something that industry is even interested in at all. 

[Video shows Charlie in front of a projector screen speaking to an audience at long tables.]

Charlie Cooper: It lets you look at your technology through a completely different lens.

[Video fades to two men in suits sitting side-by-side. The man on the right begins to speak with text appearing at the bottom of the screen, "Josh Schaidle, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Team CuB Fuels."]

Josh Schaidle: We had developed a technology within the national lab that we felt had some market potential, but really had no idea where to go and how to get that out to market.

[Video shows Josh on a stage by a projector screen speaking to an audience at tables.]

[Video cuts to a man in glasses with people in the background. Text appears at the bottom of the screen, "Tom Teynor, CEO and Founder, Divination Consulting."]

Tom Teynor: Whether it's deciding to spin out a business on their own or even just informing the research—

[Video cuts to two men talking, then to a group of men talking at a table.]

Tom Teynor: It's something that the diversity of these mentors and advisors can really help with. 

[Video returns to Tom speaking.]

Tom Teynor: It's really fun to watch that "Ah-ha" moment happen as they go through the program.

[A man in glasses standing in front of a brick wall begins to speak with text appearing at the bottom of the screen, "Mayank Malik, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Team EnergyBlox."]

Mayank Malik: We were able to verify—and also refute—some of the assumptions we were making, and we are—we made some design decisions that changed the product as it goes forward.

[Video cuts to a clip of Mayank speaking to another man sitting across from him and pointing to a piece of paper.]

[A man in a suit begins to speak with text appearing at the bottom of the screen, "Jake Gentle, Power Systems Engineer, Idaho National Laboratory, Team Dynamic Line Rating."]

Jake Gentle: It's been the ability to understand how money moves, more or less—

[Video cuts to Jake speaking in front of an audience sitting at long tables, then returns to Jake speaking.]

Jake Gentle: What markets are out there—not just in the U.S., but internationally, who the first adopters might be. 

[Video shows a woman sitting in a chair in front of a brick wall. The text, "Cinta Gomez, Lawrence Berkely National Laboratory, Team EcoPod," appears at the bottom of the screen.]

Cinta Gomez: We have a lot of collaborations already—people that are really interested in trying our system—and even job offers. 

[Video cuts to one woman listening to another woman speak, then returns to Cinta speaking.]

Cinta Gomez: We are getting some job offers from companies. They see our potential so; I think that is huge. 

[The video shows an audience at long tables listening to a panel of speakers, followed by upbeat music and the title, "Informing a Culture of Market Awareness in our Labs."]

[A man begins to speak as the screen transitions to him standing in front of a brick wall. The text, "David Chassin, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Team EnergyBlox" appears at the bottom of the screen.]

David Chassin: I think it's essential. I feel, often, we don't fully understand what the market pull is right now and how we get from our near-term opportunities through to the long-term goals that we're trying to achieve. 

[Video cuts to David sitting at a table with pens and paper and having a conversation with three other individuals. The video returns to David speaking.]

David Chassin: And I think this helps us bridge that gap. 

[Video shows Mayank in front of a brick wall speaking.]

Mayank Malik: You don't want that research to end up just in a paper. You want to have real impact on the real world. 

[Video shows Jesse standing by a podium and speaking alongside another man. The video cuts to an audience member speaking at their table, then to Jesse sitting next to Josh and speaking to the camera.]

Jesse Hensley: And it has greatly accelerated our ability to do world-class research. It opens my eyes and makes me feel like a more complete scientist and contributor to society. 

[Upbeat music plays as the screen fades to white. The text "Energy I-Corps, U.S. Department of Energy" appears.]

[End of Video]