The Long-Duration Energy Storage (LDES) Demonstrations, funded with $505 million from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, will validate new energy storage technologies and enhance the capabilities of customers and communities to integrate grid storage more effectively. DOE defines LDES as storage systems capable of delivering electricity for 10 or more hours in duration. Learn more.

$505,000,000 in Funding

Funded by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, the Long-Duration Energy Storage Program (LDES) received a $505 million to help advance LDES systems toward widespread commercial deployment by providing an opportunity for nascent LDES technologies to overcome the technical and institutional barriers that exist for full-scale deployment with a focus on a range of different technology types for a diverse set of regions.

Program Announcements

Find details about the program’s funding opportunity below and read about the latest updates on the LDES Program here.

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Letters of Intent due
December 22, 2022
Full Applications due
March 3, 2023
Expected Timeframe for DOE Selection Notifications
September 22, 2023
Expected Timeframe for Award Negotiations
Fall 2023

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Letters of Intent due
November 2, 2022
Scoping Study due
March 8, 2023
Expected Timeframe for DOE Selection Notifications
September 22, 2023
Expected Timeframe for Award Negotiations
TBD
energy storage

Today’s energy storage technologies are not sufficiently scaled or affordable to support the broad use of renewable energy on the electrical grid. Cheaper long-duration energy storage can increase grid reliability and resilience so that clean, reliable, affordable electricity is available whenever and wherever to everyone. 

This program will help advance LDES systems toward widespread commercial deployment by providing an opportunity for nascent LDES technologies to overcome the technical and institutional barriers that exist for full-scale deployment with a focus on a range of different technology types for a diverse set of regions. This investment is aligned with DOE’s Energy Storage Grand Challenge and will be critical to achieving the Department-wide Long-Duration Storage Shot goal of reducing the cost of grid-scale energy storage by 90% within the decade.

Together with the Inflation Reduction Act, which provided expanded clean energy tax credits for energy storage installation, this new investment will provide businesses the confidence they need to build and deploy innovative clean energy technologies critical to reaching our nation’s climate goals.

Energy Storage & Program Details

  • Long-Duration Energy Storage Demonstrations: Set of demonstration projects targeted towards a range of LDES technology types.  
  • Department of Energy and Department of Defense Long-Duration Energy Storage Joint Program: Collaboration between Department of Energy and Department of Defense for long-duration demonstrations on government facilities.
  • Long-Duration Energy Storage Pilot Grant Program: Program that aims to bring a range of benefits provided by storage to targeted recipients including states, Tribes, and utilities.

Eligible Uses

Eligible applicants include institutions of higher education, non-profit entities, for-profit entities, tribal nations, state and local governmental entities, incorporated consortia, and unincorporated consortia. Download the full funding opportunity for more information on eligibility..

OCED’s LDES portfolio is focused on a range of technologies with regional diversity to demonstrate promising technologies at different scales and help innovative LDES technologies to become commercially viable. These demonstrations will contribute to one or more of the following:

  • To improve the security of critical infrastructure and emergency response systems.
  • To improve the reliability of transmission and distribution systems, particularly in rural areas, including high-energy cost rural areas.
  • To optimize transmission or distribution system operation and power quality to defer or avoid costs of replacing or upgrading electric grid infrastructure, including transformers and substations.
  • To supply energy at peak periods of demand on the electric grid or during periods of significant variation of electric grid supply.
  • To reduce peak loads of homes and businesses.
  • To improve and advance power conversion systems.
  • To provide ancillary services for grid stability and management.
  • To integrate renewable energy resource production.
  • To increase the feasibility of microgrids (grid-connected or islanded mode).
  • To enable the use of stored energy in forms other than electricity to support the natural gas system and other industrial processes.
  • To integrate fast charging of electric vehicles.
  • To improve energy efficiency. 

Resources

OCED News 

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