The Clean Energy Demonstration Program on Current and Former Mine Land (CEML) will demonstrate the technical and economic viability of deploying clean energy on current (operating) and former (abandoned or inactive) mine land. These projects are expected to be replicable, providing knowledge and experience that catalyze the next generation of clean energy on mine land projects. Learn more.

$500,000,000 in Funding

Funded by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, the Clean Energy Demonstration Program on Current and Former Mine Land (CEML) received a combined $500 million to demonstrate innovative mine land conversion to clean energy projects with a goal of replication across the country. 

Program Announcements

Find details about the program’s funding opportunity below and read about the latest updates on the CEML Program here.

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Concept Papers due
May 11, 2023
Full Applications due
August 31, 2023
Expected Timeframe for DOE Selection Notifications
TBD
Expected Timeframe for Award Negotiations
TBD
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Repurposing mine land for clean energy provides a strong economic boost to America’s mining workforce and communities, setting them up to lead in the clean energy transition. Thanks to the investments from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, there is a once-in-ageneration opportunity to support key energy communities and deploy cheaper, cleaner energy across America.

Eligible clean energy technologies under this program include solar, microgrids, geothermal, direct air capture, fossil-fueled electricity generation with carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration, energy storage, and advanced nuclear technologies. 

This program requires up to five clean energy projects be carried out in diverse geographical regions, at least two of which must be solar. These demonstration projects are expected to be replicable, providing knowledge and experience that catalyze the next generation of clean energy on mine land projects. 

These demonstration projects will provide models for mine land development and community engagement that can be used by the private sector to unlock the potential of mine land for siting clean energy. OCED’s projects will prioritize job creation, greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and economic benefit for host communities.
 

Eligible Uses

Eligible applicants include institutions of higher education, non-profit entities, for-profit entities, tribal nations, state and local governmental entities, incorporated consortia, and unincorporated consortia. Download the full funding opportunity for more information on eligibility.

The term “clean energy project” means a project that demonstrates one or more of the following technologies:

  • Solar
  • Micro-grids
  • Geothermal
  • Direct air capture
  • Fossil-fueled electricity generation with carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration
  • Energy storage, including pumped storage hydropower and compressed air storage
  • Advanced nuclear technologies

The term “mine land” means:

  • Land subject to titles IV and V of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (30 U.S.C. 1231 et seq.; 30 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.); or 
  • Land that has been claimed or patented subject to sections 2319 through 2344 of the Revised Statutes (commonly known as the "Mining Law of 1872") (30 U.S.C. 22 et seq.). 

 
In selecting clean energy projects for participation in the program, the Secretary shall prioritize clean energy projects that will:

  • be carried out in a location where the greatest number of jobs can be created from the successful demonstration of the clean energy project;
  • provide the greatest net impact in avoiding or reducing greenhouse gas emissions;
  • provide the greatest domestic job creation (both directly and indirectly) during the implementation of the clean energy project;
  • provide the greatest job creation and economic development in the vicinity of the clean energy project, particularly—in economically distressed areas; and with respect to dislocated workers who were previously employed in manufacturing, coal power plants, or coal mining;
  • have the greatest potential for technological innovation and commercial deployment; 
  • have the lowest levelized cost of generated or stored energy;
  • have the lowest rate of greenhouse gas emissions per unit of electricity generated or stored; and
  • have the shortest project time from permitting to completion.
     

Resources

WEBINARS

Clean Energy Demonstration on Mine Land Technical Assistance Webinar Series
On behalf of the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), NREL provides technical assistance to communities and organizations interested in pursuing Clean Energy Demonstration Projects on Current and Former Mine Land.

CEML Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar

  • View the video recording of the Clean Energy Demonstration Program on Current and Former Mine Land Funding Opportunity Announcement Informational Webinar, featuring an overview of the program and answers to questions received on the funding opportunity, held on April 19, 2023.

WORKSHOPS

OCED held public workshops to provide a detailed overview of CEML, collect feedback from stakeholders on drivers, challenges, and potential impacts of mine land demonstrations, and offer a forum for stakeholder networking in preparation for the funding opportunity announcement.

Follow the links below to view the video recordings from OCED’s CEML Virtual Workshop:

MORE INFORMATION

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