Office of Environmental Management

SRS Event Encourages Kids to Learn About Science and Technology, Explore Careers

July 10, 2018

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Next generation radiation protection specialists learn about contamination and proper “dress-out” techniques before working with a glovebox.
Next generation radiation protection specialists learn about contamination and proper “dress-out” techniques before working with a glovebox.
Using marshmallows and toothpicks, children construct buildings and learn about structural integrity.
Using marshmallows and toothpicks, children construct buildings and learn about structural integrity.
Kids design tinfoil boats with the challenge of keeping them afloat with the addition of coins.
Kids design tinfoil boats with the challenge of keeping them afloat with the addition of coins.
Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) employees have captured, marked, and released more than 1 million amphibians and reptiles representing 100 species, including this young American Alligator.

AIKEN, S.C. – Wearing “Let Your Energy Be Your Super Power” t-shirts, more than 300 school-age children recently joined their parents and mentors for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Kids Day. The DOE-Savannah River Operations Office partnered with Centerra-SRS, the site’s security contractor, to host the educational event featuring hands-on science and technology activities, including visits with Smokey Bear and training on radiation protection “dress-out” techniques. Launched in 1993 with roughly 50 participating children, the kids day is designed to help children explore career options; gain exposure to workplace skills; understand the importance of staying in school; and shadow parents and mentors to better appreciate their jobs. In the photo above, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) employees provide hands-on learning on the biodiversity of Savannah River Site ecosystems and research the laboratory has conducted at the site since 1967. Its researchers have captured, marked, and released more than 1 million amphibians and reptiles representing 100 species, including this young American Alligator.

 

 

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