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Regulatory Expert

Position TitleRegulatory Expert
Alternate Title(s)Government Regulatory Expert, Utility Regulatory Expert, Policy & Regulatory Specialist, Policy Analyst, Public Affairs, Legislative Liaison, Government Relations, Government Affairs, Lobbyist
Education & Training LevelAdvanced, Bachelors required, prefer graduate degree
Education & Training Level DescriptionDegree in political science, law, economics, public policy, public affairs
Brief job description Regulatory experts research and keep current on various regulatory issues within the energy industry. They develop positions on policy issues, analyze how policy issues will impact business opportunities, and provide updates and strategy recommendations to senior management, sales, project development teams and other internal stakeholders.  This role often serves on various stakeholder committees, such as industry trade associations, or assists in lobbying functions during state and federal rule making procedures associated with transmission and interconnection issues, energy market issues, state Renewable Portfolio Standards, land use, siting/permitting, and taxes.
Preferred Level of EducationGraduate degree
Preferred Level of ExperienceSee the Bureau of Labor Statistics for more information.
Estimated/Expected SalarySee the Bureau of Labor Statistics for more information.
Job Profile

Regulatory experts have a strong understanding of existing legislative and regulatory issues, but more importantly, they keep up to date on various policy issues within the energy industry. They research potential changes in rules, regulations, and legislation at the state and federal levels. Using their knowledge and research, they provide information and recommendations to internal company stakeholders that can assist in strategic business planning.

A regulatory expert serves on various stakeholder committees or assists in lobbying type functions during State and Federal rule making procedures associated with transmission and interconnection issues, energy market issues, state Renewable Portfolio Standards, siting/permitting, land use, and taxes. They communicate with various stakeholders to determine issues and potential outcomes, testify at state and regional, such as with Public Utility Commissions or legislative committee hearings. They may also draft and edit new regulatory language in support of wind energy.

Job Skills
  • Analytical skills. Regulatory experts often use qualitative and quantitative research methods. They rely on their analytical skills when they collect, evaluate and interpret data.
  • Critical-thinking skills. Regulatory experts must be able to examine and process available information and draw logical conclusions from their findings.
  • Intellectual curiosity. Regulatory experts must continually explore new ideas and information in order to make new and appropriate recommendations. They must stay current on regulatory issues and come up with new ways to think about and address these issues.
  • Communication skills. Regulatory experts must be able to clearly explain policies, policy impacts, and recommendations in both spoken and written formats to many different audiences, including colleagues in their company, external stakeholders, team members and policy makers.
  • Knowledge of energy markets. Especially transmission and trading.
Resources

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