Water Power Technologies Office Budget

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Budget History

Chart of WPTO budget history.
Fiscal Year Funding
2008$9.6M
2009$39M
2010$48.7M
2011$29.2M
2012$58.1M
2013$54.7M
2014$57.8M
2015$61M
2016$70M
2017$84M
2018$105M
2019$105M

On March 11, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released its portion of the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 Budget Request. The President’s Budget Request for the Department of Energy in FY 2020 totals $31.7 billion, including $45 million for the Water Power Technologies Office. This year’s request secures America’s path to energy independence and continued historic economic growth by investing in and empowering reliable, affordable energy, advancing transformative scientific innovation, and enhancing U.S. national security.

FY 2020 funding supports early-stage R&D exploring novel concepts and approaches to capturing hydropower and marine hydrokinetic energy resources. The Office invests in hydropower technology R&D for innovative standardized and modular approaches to hydropower development that can lower overall project costs versus traditional projects at greenfield sites and non-powered dams. The Office also supports DOE’s Advanced Energy Storage Initiative and continues its focus on hydropower and pumped storage hydropower (PSH)’s roles in grid reliability and resiliency by continuing to support innovative PSH technologies and conducting new research to evaluate and improve the flexibility and grid services provided by hydropower and/or PSH. It will also support the development of innovative environmental mitigation technologies and new research to inform licensing studies and requirements facilitating reduced time, cost, and uncertainty in hydropower licensing.

In marine and hydrokinetics (MHK), the Office will support R&D to improve controls and power take-offs for early-stage wave, tidal, and ocean current technologies, ultimately leading to reduced costs and increased competitiveness of marine energy devices. Through its partnerships with the Navy and with university-National Laboratory collaborations, the program will validate reliability of marine energy technologies and the value of integrating energy from prototype devices into the electric grid. Monitoring of open water tests and continued analysis and dissemination of the results of new research is also supported to reduce perceived environmental risk and the time associated with device permitting.

For more information, see DOE’s FY2020 Budget Justification