You are here

A survey conducted worldwide between November 2010 and May 2011 asked respondents from 17 different countries questions about their willingness to purchase electric vehicles. More than half of the respondents in 14 of those countries said they would buy an electric vehicle only if the vehicle price were the same or less than a similar gasoline vehicle. In the US, only 28% of respondents were willing to pay an extra amount for an electric vehicle; 65% indicated they would only buy an EV if it were the same price or less (another 7% responded "Don't know"). India, Korea and China had the highest shares of respondents willing to pay extra.

Question: How much more would you be willing to pay for an electric vehicle compared to a similar vehicle with a gasoline engine?
Graph showing how much more consumers in seventeen countries around the world would be willing to pay to purchase an electric vehicle compared to a similiar vehicle with a gasoline engine. For more detailed information, see supporting information below.

 

Note: All currency amounts are in U.S. dollars.

Supporting Information

Question: How much more would you be willing to pay for an electric vehicle compared to a similar vehicle with a gasoline engine?
(Share of Respondents)

Country Same price or less $250 or more $500 or more $1,000 or more $2,000 or more Don't know Total
UK 71% 4% 3% 7% 7% 8% 100%
Belgium 71% 2% 5% 5% 9% 8% 100%
Australia 69% 3% 2% 7% 6% 13% 100%
Taiwan 67% 4% 7% 12% 6% 4% 100%
Japan 67% 2% 2% 5% 13% 11% 100%
Canada 66% 3% 5% 9% 8% 9% 100%
France 66% 5% 5% 10% 10% 4% 100%
Italy 66% 3% 3% 7% 11% 10% 100%
US 65% 5% 5% 9% 9% 7% 100%
Brazil 64% 5% 6% 10% 6% 9% 100%
Spain 60% 3% 8% 10% 11% 8% 100%
Turkey 56% 6% 4% 10% 14% 10% 100%
Germany 54% 3% 4% 9% 17% 13% 100%
Argentina 53% 4% 6% 12% 10% 15% 100%
India 49% 11% 10% 13% 14% 3% 100%
Korea 48% 10% 10% 15% 8% 9% 100%
China 44% 6% 10% 11% 12% 17% 100%

Note: All currency amounts are in U.S. dollars.
Source: Deloitte World EV Survey, N=over 13,000 respondents in 17 countries, conducted November 2010 – May 2011.

Return to 2011 Facts of the Week