Department of Energy

Building a Foundation - New Scholarship Announced at Argonne

February 13, 2019

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The Chicago Chapter of CHIBPSA introduced a scholarship for undergraduate and graduate students named after Ralph Muehleisen, a building scientist and engineer at Argonne, to honor him for his contributions to the field of building energy modeling.
The Chicago Chapter of CHIBPSA introduced a scholarship for undergraduate and graduate students named after Ralph Muehleisen, a building scientist and engineer at Argonne, to honor him for his contributions to the field of building energy modeling.
Argonne National Laboratory

Editor's Note: This article was originally posted on Argonne National Laboratory's website.

On October 24, the Chicago Chapter of the International Building Performance Simulation Association (CHIBPSA) introduced a scholarship for undergraduate and graduate students named after Ralph Muehleisen, a building scientist and engineer at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

Muehleisen is Argonne’s Principal Building Scientist and the Building Energy Decision and Technology Research Group Leader. He currently leads the Urban Science and Engineering Program for Argonne’s Energy Systems Division. His research focuses on increasing the efficiency and resiliency of built environments, and his projects involve urban science and engineering, reduced order and stochastic building energy modeling, understanding uncertainty and risk in building models and the integration of smart buildings and smart grids.

“I feel honored that CHIBPSA is recognizing me in this way,” said Muehleisen, ​“and I’m humbled to play a part in helping educate the next generation of building simulators. It is exciting to witness the field progress.”

The author of over 180 publications and presentations, Muehleisen serves on the board of directors at IBPSA-USA and as co-chair of the Urban Scale Simulation subcommittee of the organization’s Research Committee. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

CHIBPSA will award the scholarship, called the Ralph T. Muehleisen Scholarship for Building Simulation, to university students pursuing careers in building science and building performance modeling. The scholarship’s name honors Muehleisen for his contributions to the field of building energy modeling and his professional involvement in CHIBPSA, IBPSA-USA, and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE).

“The chapter established the scholarship in Dr. Muehleisen’s name for his advancements in education and research, unwavering mentorship of others, unremitting inspiration to the building simulation community and prominence as an industry innovator,” said Tommy Zakrzewski, the Director of Integrative Energy Engineering at HKS, Inc. and a CHIBSPA board member who lobbied for the scholarship’s name.

CHIBSPA, which consists of a diverse mix of practitioners, academics and students, introduced the scholarship at its annual fall member meeting. The Emerging Simulation Professionals committee and the Illinois Institute of Technology and University of Illinois Chicago Student chapters of IBPSA also attended the meeting.

Argonne National Laboratory seeks solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation’s first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America’s scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit the Office of Sciencewebsite.