The DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program provides an annual funding opportunity for researchers in universities and DOE national laboratories. Established in 2010, this program supports the individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in their careers and stimulates research careers in the disciplines supported by the DOE Office of Science: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), Biological and Environmental Research (BER), Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES), High Energy Physics (HEP), Isotope R&D and Production (IP), and Nuclear Physics (NP). You can find more information on the Early Career Research Program page.

September 26, 2022

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Victor M. Zavala: Then and Now / 2012 Early Career Award Winner

Through scalable algorithms and improvements to software, Victor M. Zavala is optimizing the nation’s energy infrastructure and managing network problems.

August 29, 2022

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Garret Suen: Then and Now / 2012 Early Career Award Winner

Garret Suen is identifying microbes and the enzymes they express to understand how herbivores break down plant biomass to help biofuel production.

August 8, 2022

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Jaime Marian: Then and Now / 2012 Early Career Award Winner

UCLA professor Jaime Marian searches for clean energy solutions through modeling and simulations for innovative fusion materials.

July 25, 2022

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Haim Waisman: Then and Now / 2012 Early Career Award Winner

At Columbia University, Haim Waisman has developed computational models that describe how materials fracture.

July 5, 2022

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Céline Bonfils : Then and Now / 2012 Early Career Award Winner

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, physicist Céline Bonfils studies how human activities influence climate change.

June 13, 2022

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Andreas Kemp: Then and Now / 2012 Early Career Award Winner

Short laser pulses interacting with matter are difficult to model on computers. Andreas Kemp is focused on understanding these energetic pulses.

April 11, 2022

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Yongqin Jiao: Then and Now / 2011 Early Career Award Winner

Yongqin Jiao investigated how the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus survives in high levels of uranium and its potential use for bioremediation.

March 28, 2022

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Xipeng Shen: Then and Now / 2011 Early Career Award Winner

Xipeng Shen is accelerating supercomputing results and obtaining finer-grained, more accurate scientific simulations.

February 7, 2022

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Alexandre M. Tartakovsky: Then and Now / 2011 Early Career Award Winner

Alexandre Tartakovsky develops methods to improve computational modeling to understand fluids interactions and the spreading of mass.

January 25, 2022

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Peter Lindstrom: Then and Now / 2011 Early Career Award Winner

Peter Lindstrom is the project leader at the Center for Applied Scientific Computing-developing efficient ways to avoid bottlenecks while moving data.