Participants in the joint meeting line up outside under several countries' flags
A team from NNSA visited Bulgaria’s Crisis Management and Disaster Response Centre of Excellence in Sofia this spring to develop a NATO-wide consequence management course.

Members of the NNSA Office of Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation’s Nuclear Incident Policy and Cooperation program held a joint course-development workshop with their counterparts in Bulgaria’s Crisis Management and Disaster Response Centre of Excellence in Sofia this spring.

The workshop was an opportunity for NNSA experts to discuss collaboration and partnership with the Centre with an eye on a new course for personnel from NATO members and partners.

“International partnership manifests itself in different ways,” said Ann Heinrich, head of Nuclear Incident Policy and Cooperation for NNSA. “Developing training together helps develop personal relationships and realize our mutual goals. In an emergency, that kind of mutual trust is a huge asset to NNSA and NATO.”

The director of the Centre, Col. Orlin Nikolov, briefed NNSA’s Andrae Brooks and Robert Augdahl of NNSA’s Remote Sensing Laboratory on the concept, vision, principles, and structure of the organization. Likewise, Brooks and Augdahl outlined NNSA’s expertise, and discussed how they could collaborate to develop a future course.

The meeting was the first of several expected with the Centre, which is working with NNSA to create the first international crisis response and consequence management course for NATO members and partners, expected to debut in 2023.

The Bulgarian and NNSA partners sitting at a table with flags on it.
The meeting was the first of several expected with the Centre, which is working with NNSA to debut the course next year.