Office of Environmental Management

Idaho’s AMWTP Event Focuses on Dedication, Achievements of Employees

October 15, 2019

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From left, EM Idaho Manager Jack Zimmerman, Idaho Gov. Brad Little, EM Senior Advisor Ike White, Fluor Idaho President Fred Hughes, and EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Field Operations, Jeff Griffin.
From left, EM Idaho Manager Jack Zimmerman, Idaho Gov. Brad Little, EM Senior Advisor Ike White, Fluor Idaho President Fred Hughes, and EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Field Operations, Jeff Griffin.

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – Elected officials, DOE personnel, and others recognized the efforts of employees of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) last week during an event to mark the upcoming completion of the facility’s transuranic waste debris treatment mission at DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site.

Idaho Gov. Brad Little, Idaho Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin, U.S. congressional staff members, EM Senior Advisor Ike White, Idaho Falls Mayor Rebecca Casper, and former AMWTP managers and employees joined several hundred current employees of EM cleanup contractor Fluor Idaho’s AMWTP workforce to celebrate the waste treatment accomplishment scheduled for this fall.

“Idaho is very proud of the hundreds of people who helped reach this significant cleanup milestone,” Little said. “Their hard work protects Idaho citizens and the environment, and leaves a significant and meaningful legacy for INL and the country. The INL stands out as the lead nuclear facility in the United States because of the innovation that occurred as part of this project.”

White said the environmental legacy that exists is a consequence of winning the Cold War. He said the achievements at AMWTP would not have been possible without the support of the employees, community, and elected officials.

“Thank you to the entire community,” he said.

Casper thanked the AMWTP employees for being “super citizens” who are actively involved in the community, including volunteering, making charitable donations, supporting science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) events, and mentoring and tutoring young students.

“We appreciate you,” she said.

Casper said the work done at AMWTP is a service to the rest of the nation and world.

“Every time we put a portion of legacy waste to rest, our nation is better off,” she said.

Brennan Summers, assistant to U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson of Idaho, said a statement was signed by members of Congress from Idaho and read into the congressional record recognizing the achievements of the AMWTP workforce.

An excerpt from that statement reads: “The employees of the AMWTP should be the models for the entire workforce of the DOE Complex. When they encountered challenging waste types and containers, they developed the procedures and processes to safely and compliantly address them. When the specialized equipment didn’t exist, they fabricated it, tested it, and put it to work. They adapted and found solutions to the most complex challenges they encountered.”

Fluor Idaho President Fred Hughes noted that more than 200 employees at the AMWTP have worked at the facility for 10 or more years.

“It’s my extreme pleasure working with this crew,” he said.

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