Collaboration between EM and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International has yielded five new standards and testing practices for fixatives — the latest being approved earlier this summer.

EM proactively solicits and evaluates initiatives to support the safe and efficient decommissioning of legacy nuclear facilities. The latest achievement capitalized on research led by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Applied Research Center at Florida International University (FIU).

Their work led to the development of intumescent coatings as fire resistant fixatives — an intumescent is a substance that swells up when heated and protects underlying material. In this case, the technology was applied to the development of certain fixatives that are applied to “seal in” contamination to avoid risk of exposure on structures being prepared for deactivation.

Joseph Sinicrope, left, Florida International University Applied Research Center, serves as the E10.03 Subcommittee Chair and Connor Nicholson, Savannah River National Laboratory, serves as the E10.03 Vice Chair.
Joseph Sinicrope, left, Florida International University Applied Research Center, serves as the E10.03 Subcommittee Chair and Connor Nicholson, Savannah River National Laboratory, serves as the E10.03 Vice Chair.

Through SRNL and FIU participation on the ASTM E10.03 Subcommittee on Radiological Protection for D&D of Nuclear Facilities and Components, EM collaborated with the organization, which develops and publishes technical standards for a range of materials and products.

The E10.03 Subcommittee initiated a working group in June 2021 to develop a standard specification for dust suppressant fixative technologies intended to support open-air demolition and decommissioning, and the group is on track to release its initial draft for a stakeholder ballot no later than January 2022.

EM will continue to leverage this partnership with ASTM to facilitate uniform testing and evaluation of decommissioning technologies.