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March 13, 2020
Tsuyoshi Tajima Profile Picture
Tsuyoshi Tajima: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winners
Tsuyoshi Tajima at Los Alamos National Lab is investigating the promising potential of MgB2 to coat particle accelerator components.
March 10, 2020
This storm over the Russian River in California was driven by an atmospheric river. Every time this river flooded between 2004 and 2014, it was because of one of these “rivers in the sky.”
Flooding the Sky: Navigating the Science of Atmospheric Rivers
Atmospheric rivers have a huge impact on the West Coast’s climate, so scientists are collaborating to understand their patterns.
March 6, 2020
John Kitchin Profile Picture
John Kitchin: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
John Kitchin’s Early Career Award made possible research that identified a cheap and efficient material for splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen.
February 28, 2020
Stanislav Boldyrev Profile Picture
Stanislav Boldyrev: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Stanislav Boldyrev studies magnetized-plasma turbulence, analyzing lengths from a few centimeters in the lab to thousands of light years in astronomy.
February 26, 2020
Stephen Streiffer is the director of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.
Meet the Director: Stephen Streiffer
Director Stephen Streiffer leads the Advanced Photon Source user facility in daily operations and preparations for future upgrades.
February 20, 2020
Arthi Jayaraman Profile Picture
Arthi Jayaraman: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Computational approaches enables Arthi Jayaraman to make valuable predictions that guide experiments and accelerate innovation in material sciences.
February 18, 2020
For the first ten years of operation, Vera C. Rubin Observatory will perform the Rubin Observatory Legacy Survey of Space and Time, using the Rubin Observatory LSST Camera and the Simonyi Survey Telescope.
Stargazing with Computers: What Machine Learning Can Teach Us About the Cosmos
Scientists are developing machine learning techniques now to tackle the staggering amount of data that the LSST Camera will produce in the future.
February 13, 2020
Office of Science Details from the President’s FY21 Budget
Office of Science Details from the President’s FY21 Budget
February 12, 2020
Thermal camera and visible photos of a hickory hairstreak (Satyrium caryaevorus) basking in the sun.
Beating the Heat in the Living Wings of Butterflies
Columbia engineers & Harvard biologists discover that butterflies have specialized behaviors & wing scales to protect the living parts of their wings.
February 10, 2020
DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is using a sophisticated cooling system to keep qubits – the heart of quantum computers – cold enough for scientists to study them for future use in quantum computers.
Creating the Heart of a Quantum Computer: Developing Qubits
Creating hardware for quantum computers isn’t easy; researchers are tackling it with DOE support.
February 7, 2020
Alysia Marino Profile Picture
Alysia Marino: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Marino studied the properties of neutrino interactions in water and improved scientists’ understanding of neutrino fluxes generated in beamlines.
January 31, 2020
Ruben Juanes Profile Picture
Ruben Juanes: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Ruben Juanes’ Early Career Award helped develop a program to investigate fundamental mechanisms of fluid-fluid displacement in porous media.
January 28, 2020
Guy Savard directs the ATLAS user facility, the world’s first superconducting linear accelerator for heavy ions at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier.
Meet the Director: Guy Savard
In addition to ATLAS director duties, Guy Savard conducts his own studies, trying to reverse engineer the conditions in astrophysical events.
January 24, 2020
Designing and building qubit chips, the heart of quantum computers, are one of the areas that the new Quantum Information Science Centers will tackle.
New Centers Lead the Way Towards a Quantum Future
New Quantum Information Science Centers will be key to technologies harnessing quantum physics.
January 17, 2020
Marivi Fernández-Serra Profile Picture
Marivi Fernández-Serra: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Fernández-Serra is improving our understanding of electrically induced chemical reactions in the condensed phase and at the liquid-metal interface.
January 15, 2020
Theta is one of the supercomputers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Ian Foster has helped develop new technologies so scientists can get the most out of using these computers.
The Big Questions: Ian Foster on High-Performance Computing
Scientists recognized by the 2019 DOE Office of Science Distinguished Scientists Fellows Award are pursuing answers to science’s biggest questions.
January 13, 2020
Distinguished Scientists Fellow Sally Dawson from DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory works to understand the properties of the Higgs Boson discovered using the ATLAS experiment at CERN.
The Big Questions: Sally Dawson on the Higgs Boson
Scientists recognized by the 2019 DOE Office of Science Distinguished Scientists Fellows Award are pursuing answers to science’s biggest questions.
January 10, 2020
Daniel Bardayan Profile Picture
Daniel Bardayan: Then and Now / Early Career Award Winner
University of Notre Dame professor Daniel Bardayan studies the astrophysical reactions that power stellar explosions and make elements.
January 7, 2020
Vera Rubin operated the 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, Kent Ford's spectrograph is attached.
First National US Observatory to be Named After a Woman
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will now be named the National Science Foundation Vera C. Rubin Observatory (Rubin Observatory or VRO).
January 3, 2020
David Shih Profile Picture
David Shih: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
David Shih and his team have identified a number of new search strategies for supersymmetry which experimentalists are actively pursuing today.
December 23, 2019
DOE’s Office of Science shared more than 1500 stories about our research in 2019.
Top Posts of 2019
The most popular posts of the year shared by the Office of Science.
December 20, 2019
Benjamin Monreal Profile Picture
Benjamin Monreal: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Measuring the mass of a neutrino is an international, collaborative effort to develop detection methods and apparatus.
December 16, 2019
The PHENIX detector at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) records many different particles emerging from RHIC collisions, including photons, electrons, muons, and quark-containing particles called hadrons.
The Big Questions: Barbara Jacak on the Quark-Gluon Plasma
Scientists recognized by the 2019 DOE Office of Science Distinguished Scientists Fellows Award are pursuing answers to science’s biggest questions.
December 12, 2019
Youssef M. Marzouk Profile Picture
Youssef M. Marzouk: Then and Now / 2010 Early Career Award Winner
Mathematical methods to quantify uncertainties in computer models are the focus of Youssef Marzouk’s research, funded by his 2010 Early Career Award.
December 11, 2019
An artist's impression of a light-induced charge density wave (CDW).
Using Light to Generate Order in an Exotic Material
Physics experiment with ultrafast laser pulses produces a previously unseen phase of matter.