Department of Energy

Supercomputing and Exascale

Supercomputers help scientists solve some of the world's toughest challenges. The Energy Department is supporting exascale supercomputers, 10 to 20 times faster than today's machines.

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What Is A Supercomputer? | The Supercomputing Series
Learn what supercomputers are and how they work. 

Supercomputers are used to model and simulate complex, dynamic systems that would be too expensive, impractical or impossible to physically demonstrate. Supercomputers are changing the way scientists explore the evolution of our universe, biological systems, weather forecasting and even renewable energy.

The Energy Department's National Labs have some of the most significant high performance computing resources available, including some of the fastest supercomputers in the world. The National Labs make their high performance computing facilities available to researchers from industry and academia so that these public investments in state-of-the-art technology are able to generate the greatest possible intellectual and economic benefit.

Exascale Supercomputers

Exascale supecomputers are the next generation of supercomputers, allowing scientists to better simulate the complex processes involved in stockpile stewardship, medicine, biotechnology, advanced manufacturing, energy, material design and the physics of the universe, more quickly and with higher definition.

Exascale News and Views

Exascale systems are capable of at least a billion-billion calculations per second, 10 to 20 times faster than today's supercomputers.
Our new exascale machines will allow new breakthroughs in science and industry through modeling and simulation and high-performance data analysis.
Request for Proposal calls for a system to be deployed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.
Exascale Computing Project
The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Exascale Computing Project is to accelerate delivery of a capable exascale computing ecosystem.
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Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Summit Supercomputer

Summit Supercomputer

Oak Ridge National Laboratory unveiled Summit as the world’s most powerful and smartest scientific supercomputer. With a peak performance of 200,000 trillion calculations per second—or 200 petaflops, Summit will be eight times more powerful than America’s current top-ranked system. 

Summit will provide unprecedented computing power for research in energy, advanced materials, and artificial intelligence, among other domains. Summit will enable scientific discoveries that were previously impractical or impossible.

Summit Supercomputer Ranked Fastest Computer in the World
Designation recognizes the IBM-built system as the science community’s most powerful computational tool for solving problems.
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