Office of Electricity

Recognizing Innovation at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Michael Stadler, PECASE Winner

May 5, 2016

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Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, LBNL Staff Scientist Michael Stadler, and Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman at the May 4, 2016 ceremony honoring this year's 13 PECASE winners funded by the Energy Department. | Photo courtesy of DOE's Office of Science

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, LBNL Staff Scientist Michael Stadler, and Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman at the May 4, 2016 ceremony honoring this year's 13 PECASE winners funded by the Energy Department. | Photo courtesy of DOE's Office of Science

I had the pleasure of participating in a ceremony this week honoring this year’s 13 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) winners funded by the Energy Department. The PECASE is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scientists and engineers who are early in their independent research careers. President Obama named a total of 105 PECASE winners from across the federal government earlier this year.

Michael Stadler, a staff scientist who leads the Grid Integration Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, was named a PECASE recipient for driving the development of the OE-funded microgrid modeling tool known as the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Dr. Stadler’s work, which has contributed to the successful integration of renewables onto the grid, is the latest example of innovation coming out of DOE’s national labs that is transforming the nation’s power grid. Advanced distribution systems that use microgrids, which are localized grids that can disconnect from the broader electric grid to operate autonomously and help mitigate grid disturbances to strengthen grid resilience, will be crucial to next-generation electric distribution systems.   

The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model is designed to help utilities minimize the cost of operating on-site generation and combined heat and power systems. Using state-of-the-art optimization techniques, it assesses distributed energy resources and loads in microgrids, finding the optimal combination of generation and storage equipment to minimize energy costs and/or CO2 emissions at a given site, while also considering strategies such as load-shifting and demand-response. DER-CAM is now being used by more than 350 registered users worldwide. Congratulations to Michael Stadler!

To learn more about OE’s portfolio of activities that focuses on the development and implementation of microgrids to further improve reliability and resiliency of the grid, please visit the microgrid section of our website.