Office of Environmental Management

Idaho Site Puts Engineering Principles Into Action for Students

March 5, 2019

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Joseph and Ashley Short watch as Fluor Idaho Mechanical Engineer Elizabeth Bush shows how the pitch of a turbine blade can impact how much electricity is made by a wind turbine.
Joseph and Ashley Short watch as Fluor Idaho Mechanical Engineer Elizabeth Bush shows how the pitch of a turbine blade can impact how much electricity is made by a wind turbine.

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – Area students have a better idea of how engineering principles impact their lives thanks to engineers from Fluor Idaho, EM’s cleanup contractor at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

   More than 400 students participated in the Fluor Idaho-Museum of Idaho Engineering Day during the Feb. 17-23 National Engineering Week. They gained a better understanding of how bridges work, learned about how photovoltaics and wind power can generate electricity, and even tested the Archimedes' principle on water displacement.

   “Fluor Idaho engineers did an amazing job engaging the kids in the activities they brought to demonstrate engineering principles,” Museum of Idaho Director of Education Chloe Doucette said. “These were fun lessons, but more important, each display helped children learn by sparking their problem-solving and discovery skills, and actively developing solutions.”

Concepts associated with bridge construction are tested by Liam Tom and his father Bryan under the watchful eye of electrical engineer Bill Reed.
Concepts associated with bridge construction are tested by Liam Tom and his father Bryan under the watchful eye of electrical engineer Bill Reed.
Fluor Idaho mechanical engineers Chris Graham and Derek Allen demonstrate how pulleys can provide a mechanical advantage to lifting heavy weights to, from left, Jennifer Redman and her daughters Emma and Abby.
Fluor Idaho mechanical engineers Chris Graham and Derek Allen demonstrate how pulleys can provide a mechanical advantage to lifting heavy weights to, from left, Jennifer Redman and her daughters Emma and Abby.
Lea Squires and her daughter Rylea fashion a container used to test Archimedes theory of water displacement.
Lea Squires and her daughter Rylea fashion a container used to test Archimedes theory of water displacement.

Fluor Idaho Chief Engineer Joe Giebel coordinated Fluor Idaho’s involvement in the event.

   “As students and their parents discovered, engineering can be fun,” Giebel said. “Concepts that might seem difficult can be easily explained and, in the process, we encourage students’ active engagement in finding solutions and learning.”

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