Schneider Electric Goes Platinum—and Silver—in Superior Energy Performance

October 1, 2014

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Schneider Electric's Lexington, Kentucky facility. <em>Photo courtesy of Schneider Electric.</em>

Schneider Electric's Lexington, Kentucky facility. Photo courtesy of Schneider Electric.

AMO is proud to announce that Schneider Electric now has five manufacturing facilities certified in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Superior Energy Performance™ (SEP) program and ISO 50001.  Two Platinum level facilities—Smyrna, Tennessee, and Seneca, South Carolina—improved their energy performance by more than 15%. Three Silver level plants—Lincoln, Nebraska; Lexington, Kentucky; and Cedar Rapids, Iowa—improved energy performance by more than 5%.

To qualify for SEP, all five Schneider Electric facilities set up a robust energy management system, improved their energy performance, and had the results independently verified. And all five earned certification in the ISO 50001 standard for energy management systems as part of the SEP process.

"We've found that Superior Energy Performance is a great way to drive down energy use and costs across the company," said Dennis Edwards, Schneider Electric's Energy Manager North America. "With each plant, it becomes easier to apply the SEP framework and generate real savings that persist over time."

Schneider Electric is a charter member of the Industrial SEP Accelerator. The Accelerator program, a new part of DOE's Better Buildings Initiative, supports of the President's Climate Action Plan by engaging leaders in demonstrating specific innovative policies and approaches that will accelerate investment in energy efficiency.

Superior Energy Performance™ is a DOE-administered certification program that provides guidance, tools, and protocols for any facilities that wish to gain deeper, more sustained savings from ISO 50001. SEP also complements and supports the industrial part of DOE's Better Buildings Initiative by verifying facility-level energy performance improvements and savings achieved by participants in the Better Buildings, Better Plants program. Members of the U.S. Council for Energy Efficient Manufacturing, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the ANSI-ASQ National Accreditation Board developed SEP as a transparent system for certifying improvements in energy performance and management practices.