Advanced Scientific Computing Research

The Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program leads the nation and the world in supercomputing, high-end computational science, and advanced networking for science.
 
Maintaining U.S. leadership requires specialized computer scientists and applied mathematicians who know how to develop supercomputing methods to harness supercomputers to solve real world problems today and develop the technology of the future. Supercomputers push the edge of what is possible for US science and innovation—enabling scientists and engineers to explore systems too large, too complex, too dangerous, too small, or too fleeting to do in the real world. From atoms to astrophysics understanding these complex systems delivers new materials, new drugs, more efficient engines and turbines, better weather forecasts, and other technologies to maintain U.S. competitiveness in a wide array of industries.
 
We support U.S. research at hundreds of institutions and deploy open-access supercomputing and network facilities at our National Laboratories. Our supercomputers are the world’s most powerful and our high-speed network is specially built for moving enormous scientific data, at light speed. From artificial intelligence to quantum computing, our vibrant research community keeps the U.S. ahead in a rapidly evolving high-tech field and impacted industries. Through strong partnerships between scientists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists, we maintain U.S. leadership in science, technology, and innovation.
 
Learn more about the mission of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and how we support it here.

Introducing Summit

The biggest problems in science require supercomputers of unprecedented capability. That’s why the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) launched Summit, the world's fastest supercomputer. Summit is providing scientists with incredible computing power to solve challenges in energy, artificial intelligence, human health, and other research areas, that were simply out of reach until now. These discoveries will help shape our understanding of the universe, bolster US economic competitiveness, and contribute to a better future. 

Science on Summit

ASCR Science Highlights

New Geometric Model Improves Predictions of Fluid Flow in Rock
June 14, 2019
Supercomputer validates mathematical approach for describing geological features.
Learn More
High-Fidelity Multiphysics Simulations to Improve Nuclear Reactor Safety and Economics
June 12, 2019
Engineers can model heat distribution in reactor designs with fewer or no approximations.
Learn More
Solving a Beta Decay Puzzle
June 11, 2019
Researchers use advanced nuclear models to explain 50-year mystery surrounding the process stars use to transform elements.
Learn More
Watching the Rain in Climate Models
June 6, 2019
Scientists use supercomputers to determine how reliably a popular Earth system model represents precipitation regionally and globally.
Learn More
Simulations Shed Light on Self-Healing Cement
June 6, 2019
A first-of-its-kind computer simulation reveals self-healing cement for geothermal and oil and gas wells performs better than originally thought.
Learn More
Computer Simulation Shows Astrophysical Particle Acceleration
June 5, 2019
Particles act in a way that justifies extrapolating simulation results to astrophysical scales.
Learn More
STAR Gains Access to “Wimpy” Quarks and Gluons
June 1, 2019
Low-momentum (wimpy) quarks and gluons contribute to proton spin, offering insights into protons’ behavior in all visible matter.
Learn More
Laser Focus Shines Light on How Nanoparticles Form
May 30, 2019
Titan supercomputer tells origin story of nanoparticle size distributions with large-scale simulations.
Learn More
Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning Accelerate Efforts to Develop Clean, Virtually Limitless Fusion Energy
April 22, 2019
Nuclear fusion power delivered by magnetic confinement tokamak reactors carries the promise of sustainable and clean energy for the future.
Learn More
Sea Quark Spin Surprise!
April 18, 2019
Since the 1980s, scientists have known that quark and antiquark spins within a proton account for, at best, a quarter of the overall proton spin.
Learn More

ASCR Program News

U.S. Supercomputers Still Fastest In The World
Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories continue to house the fastest supercomputers in the world, according to the new TOP500 List.
Learn More
U.S. Department of Energy and Cray to Deliver Record-Setting Frontier Supercomputer at ORNL
Exascale system expected to be world’s most powerful computer for science and innovation.
Learn More
Department of Energy Announces $20 Million for Artificial Intelligence Research
Research aims at improving A.I. as a tool of grid resiliency and science.
Learn More
Gabriel Casabona Receives Prestigious Physics Fellowship from the U.S. Department of Energy
Casabona has been named one of just 25 recipients of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship.
Learn More
The ‘Little’ Computer Cluster That Could
Decades before “big data” and “the cloud” were a part of our everyday lives and conversations, a custom computer cluster based at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) enabled physicists around the world to remotely and simultaneously analyze and visualize data. The Parallel Distributed Systems Facility (PDSF) cluster, which had served as a steady workhorse in supporting groundbreaking and even Nobel-winning research around the world since the 1990s, switched off last month.
Learn More
Superfacility Framework Advances Photosynthesis Research
For more than a decade, a team of international researchers led by Berkeley Lab bioscientists has been studying Photosystem II, a protein complex in green plants, algae, and cyanobacteria that plays a crucial role in photosynthesis. They’re now moving more quickly toward an understanding of this three-billion-year-old biological system, thanks to an integrated superfacility framework established between LCLS, ESnet, and NERSC.
Learn More

ASCR Subprograms

A cylindrical shock wave produces this intricate flow pattern

Applied Mathematics Research

The applied mathematics research program develops the key mathematical advances, algorithms, and software for using high-performance scientific computing to solve real-world problems.

Learn More 

ASCR Computer Science Research

Computer Science Research

The computer science research program supports research to enable computing and networking at extreme scales and generate innovative advancements in computer performance.

Learn More

ASCR Computational Partnerships

Computational Partnerships

Our partnership program supports deep collaborations between discipline scientists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists to accelerate scientific computing.

Learn More

ASCR Emerging Technologies

Emerging Technologies

Computer technology is a rapidly advancing field. Emerging technologies are supported through the Research and Evaluation Prototypes program and addresses the challenges of next-generation technologies.

Learn More

ASCR Supercomputing and Network Facilities

Supercomputing and Network Facilities

Open to researchers from industry, academia, and the national laboratories, ASCR supercomputers are among the fastest in the world and our network is specifically engineered to quickly moving large scientific data.

Learn More

 

Contact Information

Advanced Scientific Computing Research
U.S. Department of Energy
SC-21/Germantown Building
1000 Independence Avenue., SW
Washington, DC 20585
P: (301) 903 - 7486
F: (301) 903 - 4846