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Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in a Texas Clean Energy Project.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in a Texas Clean Energy Project.

Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS), also referred to as carbon capture, utilization and sequestration, is a process that captures carbon dioxide emissions from sources like coal-fired power plants and either reuses or stores it so it will not enter the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide storage in geologic formations includes oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams and deep saline reservoirs -- structures that have stored crude oil, natural gas, brine and carbon dioxide over millions of years. 

The Energy Department supports research and development of tools to assess the environmental fitness and safety of -- and predictability of future capacity within -- proposed geologic storage sites. We’re also developing models that simulate the flow of stored carbon dioxide, to help understand and predict chemical changes and effects of increased pressure that may occur.

Featured

Energy Secretary Moniz Visits Clean Coal Facility in Mississippi
On Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, Secretary Moniz and international energy officials toured Kemper, the nation's largest carbon capture and storage facility, in Liberty, Mississippi.

A small Mississippi town is making history with the largest carbon capture and storage plant in the U.S.

Carbon Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal
The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni, Florin Girlea, Vincenzo Verrelli, Bon Calayag, Vladimir Balepin, Kirk Featherstone. | Courtesy of the ICES team.

As the largest domestically-produced source of energy here in the U.S., coal is used to generate about half of our nation’s electricity. So how can we make traditional energy sources like coal cleaner and safer for all Americans?

10 Questions for a Spectroscopy Expert: Nancy Hess
Nancy Hess  | Photo Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL)

Dr. Hess is using her expertise in molecular level spectroscopy to protect water supplies and advance carbon capture and sequestration technologies. And find out how the Apollo missions, Jacques Cousteau and the Krebs cycle all had a hand in encouraging her interests in science.

Cleaning Up Coal
Pete McGrail, a Laboratory Fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is part of a team studying basalts to determine how carbon dioxide can be safely and permanently stored in these massive, deep underground rock formations. | Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

How we're making coal a better energy source than it used to be.