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Natural Gas

Many heavy-duty fleets depend on diesel fuel. But an increasing number of trucking companies are transitioning their vehicles to run on liquefied natural gas (LNG), reducing fuel costs and harmful emissions in the process. <a href="/node/655801">Learn more</a> about the Energy Department's work to advance natural gas vehicle technology. | Photo courtesy of New Haven Clean Cities Coalition.

Many heavy-duty fleets depend on diesel fuel. But an increasing number of trucking companies are transitioning their vehicles to run on liquefied natural gas (LNG), reducing fuel costs and harmful emissions in the process. Learn more about the Energy Department's work to advance natural gas vehicle technology. | Photo courtesy of New Haven Clean Cities Coalition.

Natural gas is an abundant resource across the United States, and new discoveries and extraction methods have led to a dramatic rise in shale gas development -- making America the world’s leading natural gas producer.

As part of a comprehensive all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department is committed to safe development of America’s natural gas resources. Among our efforts, we invest in innovative research projects, explore ways to develop natural gas from methane hydrates and support deployment of natural gas-powered alternative fuel vehicles, which are ideal for high-mileage, centrally fueled fleets that operate within a limited area.

 

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Producing Natural Gas From Shale
The Office of Fossil Energy sponsored early research that refined more cost-effective and innovative production technologies for U.S. shale gas production -- such as directional drilling.  By 2035, EIA projects that shale gas production will rise to 13.6 trillion cubic feet, representing nearly half of all U.S. natural gas production. | Image courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy.

By 2035, EIA projects that shale gas production will rise to 13.6 trillion cubic feet. When you consider that 1 tcf of natural gas is enough to heat 15 million homes for one year, the importance of this resource to the nation becomes obvious.

ARPA-E Q&A: Transforming How We Get Our Fuel
ARPA-E Program Director Dr. Ramon Gonzalez focuses on using microorganisms to convert natural gas into liquid fuel. | Photo courtesy of Jeff Fitlow, Rice University.

ARPA-E is exploring ways to use microorganisms to convert natural gas into liquid fuel. Learn what this means for transportation in the U.S.

New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future
Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas.

New research projects will help study methane hydrates and their implications for future resources, geohazards, and the environment.

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential
Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman tours Proinlosa Energy Corp. in Houston, Texas. Proinlosa is a company in the wind turbine manufacturing supply chain that develops tower parts and has benefitted from the Production Tax Credit (PTC). | Photo courtesy of Keri Fulton.

New projects, funded by the Energy Department, will research ways to increase production of natural gas by reducing our dependency on foreign oil and creating American jobs.