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Computing

Fun fact: Most systems require air conditioning or chilled water to cool super powerful supercomputers, but the Olympus supercomputer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is cooled by the location's 65 degree groundwater. Traditional cooling systems could cost up to $61,000 in electricity each year, but this more efficient setup uses 70 percent less energy. | Photo courtesy of PNNL.

Fun fact: Most systems require air conditioning or chilled water to cool super powerful supercomputers, but the Olympus supercomputer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is cooled by the location's 65 degree groundwater. Traditional cooling systems could cost up to $61,000 in electricity each year, but this more efficient setup uses 70 percent less energy. | Photo courtesy of PNNL.

Supercomputers are used to model and simulate complex, dynamic systems that would be too expensive, impractical or impossible to physically demonstrate. Supercomputers are changing the way scientists explore the evolution of our universe, climate change, biological systems, weather forecasting and even renewable energy.

The Energy Department's National Labs have some of the most significant high performance computing resources available, including 32 of the 500 fastest supercomputers in the world. The National Labs make their high performance computing facilities available to researchers from industry and academia so that these public investments in state-of-the-art technology are able to generate the greatest possible intellectual and economic benefit.

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National Lab Projects Win R&D 100 Awards
In the photo above, a mirrored parabolic dish directs sunbeams to a central point, where a device absorbs the solar heat to make syngas, solar-boosted natural gas. This new system was recognized with a 2014 R&D 100 Award. | Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Lab.

From solar-boosted natural gas to a more efficient electric vehicle battery charger, innovations by the Energy Department's National Labs swept the field in this year's R&D 100 awards, the "Oscars of Innovation."

A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now
Computing

Critics often say America's clean energy future will “always be five years away.” For four key clean energy technologies, that clean energy future has already arrived.

Day 2 at the 2014 ARPA-E Innovation Summit

A spirit of entrepreneurship was in the air on day two of the ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit.