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Science Education

Learn more about <a href="/node/771021">Thomas Edison</a> and <a href="/node/770876">Nikola Tesla</a>, two of history's most important energy inventors, and how their rivalry and scientific innovations still impact the way we use energy today. | Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department.

Learn more about Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla, two of history's most important energy inventors, and how their rivalry and scientific innovations still impact the way we use energy today. | Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department.

For kids of all ages, there is always something new to learn about science and technology. The Energy Department supports science education through educational online content, resources for parents and teachers, internships and student partnership programs, and national events like Solar Decathlon and the National Science Bowl.

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Video: Training Clean Energy Leaders of the Future

Solar Decathlon 2013 might have ended, but it is having a lasting effect on sustainable design and our nation's clean energy leaders.

Fourth Graders Power Their Classroom with Solar Energy

Video documents a group of fourth graders quest to take their classroom "off the grid."

Top 6 Things You Didn't Know About Solar Energy
Installing a concentrating solar power system in Gila Bend, Arizona. The curved  mirrors are tilted toward the sun, focusing sunlight on tubes that run the length of the mirrors. The reflected sunlight heats a fluid flowing through the tubes. The hot fluid then is used to boil water in a conventional steam-turbine generator to produce electricity. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder.

Counting down our list of top things you didn't know about solar energy -- read on for more on the most abundant energy resource known to mankind.

Parents and Kids: Energize Your Summer
Did you know: Incandescent light bulbs only convert about 10 percent of the energy they consume into light and the rest is released as heat. The Energy Department's Energy Bike demonstrates the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for power at their Earth Day assembly, learning firsthand about energy efficiency. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department.

This summer, keep your kids engaged with fun and educational energy-related activities.