You are here

Energy Efficiency

From the incandescent to CFLs to LEDs, we're exploring the <a href="/node/772396">long history of the light bulb</a> and how it led to new technology breakthroughs.

From the incandescent to CFLs to LEDs, we're exploring the long history of the light bulb and how it led to new technology breakthroughs.

Every year, much of the energy the U.S. consumes is wasted through transmission, heat loss and inefficient technology -- costing American families and businesses money, and leading to increased carbon pollution.

Energy efficiency is one of the easiest and most cost effective ways to combat climate change, clean the air we breathe, improve the competitiveness of our businesses and reduce energy costs for consumers. The Department of Energy is working with universities, businesses and the National Labs to develop new, energy-efficient technologies while boosting the efficiency of current technologies on the market. 

Featured

How 3D Printers Work
3D Printing in 30 Seconds

As part of our How Energy Works series, learn everything you need to know about 3D printers, from how they work to the different types of systems to the future of the technology.

Top 4 Energy Department Inventions Saving You Energy & Money at Home

Learn how the Energy Department is helping lay the foundation for more efficient homes by developing energy-saving technologies.

Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Cooling
Just in time for summer, our new Energy Saver 101 infographic covers everything you need to know about home cooling. Download a <a href="/node/920771">high-resolution version</a> of the home cooling infographic. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department.

Just in time for summer, learn everything you need to know about home cooling with our new Energy Saver 101 infographic.

R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what had only been a motion detection before. The new sensor combines an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms to detect movement and human presence in a room with an accuracy of more than 90 percent -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL.

As part of our coverage on this year's R&D 100 awards, we're profiling a new smart sensor developed by NREL researchers that could help commercial buildings save on lighting and ventilation costs.