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DOE Awards Contract for Idaho Clean-up Project (ICP) Core

February 4, 2016 - 6:15pm


Cincinnati -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award of a contract to Fluor Idaho, LLC, for the performance of ongoing Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) and Idaho Clean-up Project (ICP) work scopes in support of the DOE Office of Environmental Management’s cleanup mission at the Idaho Site. The value of the contract is $1.4 billion (including options), and the contract term five years. Two proposals were received in response to the solicitation.

In an effort to align contractor and taxpayer interests, the ICP Core contract is a performance based contract type that is primarily Cost-Plus-Incentive-Fee (CPIF) with some scope set up as Cost-Plus-Fixed-Fee (CPFF). The contract includes Cost Incentive, Schedule Milestone, Annual Milestone, and Performance Incentive fees, and will allow DOE to incentivize the contractor for meeting the contract requirements.

At the conclusion of this contract it is anticipated that all Idaho Settlement Agreement (ISA) transuranic (TRU) waste will be dispositioned out of Idaho and all Agreement to Implement/CERCLA Record of Decision buried waste will be exhumed from the Subsurface Disposal Area.

The base scope to be performed under this contract includes: stabilizing and storage of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste; dispositioning transuranic waste; retrieving targeted buried waste; closing the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm; maintaining Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial actions; and operating and maintaining the INTEC, Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), and the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility (RSWF) facility infrastructure. Option scope to be performed under this contract includes: Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) operations. The IWTU option scope will be exercised at contract award.

The mission of the Office of Environmental Management is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research.