High Energy Physics

High Energy Physics (HEP) explores what the world is made of and how it works at the smallest and largest scales, seeking new discoveries from the tiniest particles to the outer reaches of space. This quest inspires young minds, trains an expert workforce, and drives innovation that improves the nation’s health, wealth, and security.

Our research is inspired by some of the biggest questions about our universe. What is it made of? What forces govern it? How did become the way it is today? Finding these answers requires the combined efforts some of the largest scientific collaborations in the world, using some of the most sensitive detectors in the world, at some of the largest scientific machines in the world.

We support U.S. researchers that play leading roles in these international efforts and world-leading facilities at our National Laboratories that make this science possible. We also develop new accelerator, detector, and computational tools to open new doors to discovery science, and through Accelerator Stewardship, work to make transformational accelerator technology widely available to science and industry.

Learn more about the High Energy Physics mission and how we support it here.

 

Small Particles, Big Science: The International LBNF/DUNE Project
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Camera

HEP Subprograms

Energy Frontier - Researchers at the Energy Frontier use the world’s largest and highest energy particle accelerator to recreate the universe as it was a billionth of a second after the big bang

Energy Frontier

Researchers at the Energy Frontier use the world’s largest and highest energy particle accelerator to recreate the universe as it was a billionth of a second after the Big Bang.

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Intensity Frontier - Researchers at the Intensity Frontier investigate some of the rarest particle interactions in nature and subtle effects that require large data sets to observe and measure.

Intensity Frontier

Researchers at the Intensity Frontier investigate some of the rarest particle interactions in nature and subtle effects that require large data sets to observe and measure.

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Cosmic Frontier - Researchers at the Cosmic Frontier use naturally occurring cosmic particles and phenomena to reveal the nature of dark matter, cosmic acceleration, and more.

Cosmic Frontier

Researchers at the Cosmic Frontier use naturally occurring cosmic particles and phenomena to reveal the nature of dark matter, cosmic acceleration, and more.

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Theoretical and Computational Physics - Theoretical and computational physics provide the vision and the framework for extending our knowledge of particles and the universe.

Theoretical and Computational Physics

Theoretical and computational physics provide the vision and the framework for extending our knowledge of particles and the universe.

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Advanced Technology R&D - Cutting-edge research in the physics of particle accelerators, particle beams, and particle detection enables scientists to stay on the threshold of discovery.

Advanced Technology R&D

Cutting-edge research in the physics of particle accelerators, particle beams, and particle detection enables scientists to stay on the threshold of discovery.

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Accelerator Stewardship - Supporting use-inspired basic research in accelerator science and technology to make particle accelerator technology widely available to science and industry.

Accelerator Stewardship

Supporting use-inspired basic research in accelerator science and technology to make particle accelerator technology widely available to science and industry.

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HEP Science Highlights

Extracting Signs of the Elusive Neutrino
Scientists use software to "develop" images that trace neutrinos' interactions in a bath of cold liquid argon.
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MicroBooNE, Machine Learning, and Liquid Argon
Researchers on the MicroBooNE neutrino experiment at Fermilab designed a type of machine learning algorithm, convolutional neural networks, to
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CSI: Neutrinos Cast No Shadows
Neutrinos usually sail through matter without bumping into it. But once in a while, it does shake hands with a nucleus, and sometimes the handshake
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ArgoNeuT Hits a Home Run with Measurements of Neutrinos in Liquid Argon
All baseball fans know that probability is a huge component of their favorite sport. In baseball, each batter has a certain probability of hitting
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Cryocooler Cools an Accelerator Cavity
All SRF particle accelerators to-date use liquid helium to maintain the extremely cold temperatures necessary for sustaining superconductivity.
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Breaking the Symmetry Between Fundamental Forces
At present, scientists think that at the highest energies and earliest moments in time, all the fundamental forces may have existed as a single
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Beautiful Higgs Decays
The 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson marked the beginning of an experimental program aimed at determining the properties of the newly discovered
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ATLAS Experiment Uncovers Higgs Boson Interactions with Heaviest Quarks
The discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012 relied on the observation of Higgs bosons
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Highest Precision Prediction of Muon “Wobble”
Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ran a version of the “muon wobble” experiment, known as “Muon g-2,” in
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How to Cope with Cases of Mistaken Identity: MINERvA’s Tale of Pions and Neutrinos
Scientists are working to resolve a case of mistaken identity in the world of physics. They want to disambiguate two types of neutrinos.
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HEP Program News

Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility Pre-Excavation Work is in Full Swing
The LBNF construction in Lead, South Dakota is under way, and a fleet of yellow pickup trucks has become the talk of the town and evidence of the beehive of construction activity that Fermilab is managing at the Sanford Underground Research Facility.
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Brookhaven Lab and the Belle II Experiment
If you think keeping track of the photos on your mobile phone is a challenge, imagine how daunting the job would be if your camera were taking thousands of photos every second. That’s the task faced by particle physicists working on the Belle II experiment at Japan’s SuperKEKB particle accelerator, which started its first physics run in late March. Belle II physicists will sift through “snapshots” of millions of subatomic smashups per day—as well as data on the conditions of the “camera” at the time of each collision—to seek answers to some of the biggest questions in physics.
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Department of Energy to Provide $24 Million to Study Dark Matter
Projects to take advantage of recent theory and technology advances.
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Contact Information

High Energy Physics
U.S. Department of Energy
SC-25/Germantown Building
1000 Independence Ave., SW
Washington, DC 20585
P: (301) 903-3624
F: (301) 903-2597
E: Email Us

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