National Nuclear Security Administration

Y-12’s protective force trains with the Marines

December 14, 2018

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The Y-12 National Security Complex Protective Force benchmarks tactics and techniques with Marines from the Close Quarters Battle School in Virginia.
The Y-12 National Security Complex Protective Force benchmarks tactics and techniques with Marines from the Close Quarters Battle School in Virginia.

Members of Y-12 National Security Complex’s protective force have a collaborative training relationship with the U.S. Marines.

For two years, the site’s protective force and the Marines have trained both at Y-12 and on Marine bases for exercises. Recently, Marines from the Close Quarters Battle School in Chesapeake, Virginia, visited the NNSA site to share tactics and approaches with Y-12’s protective force’s Tactical Operations Group.

“The best part about this is that they’re training guys who are performing the same mission that we are,” said Neal Wolfenbarger, head of tactical operations for the protective force. “They’re just performing it with the Department of Defense instead of the Department of Energy.”

Y-12’s group and the Marines traded marksmanship tips on the range and room-clearing techniques during training scenarios.

“Information-sharing on close quarters battle is a big takeaway for us,” said Y-12’s Lt. Col. Chris Mathews. “The techniques that we picked up from the Marines will allow for a greater survivability of the protective force during these types of situations.”

“The Marine Corps obviously brings a wealth of cutting edge Close Quarters Battle skills from experience forged in the fires of combat. This sort of collaboration between NNSA protective forces and the Marine Corps Security Forces allows us to learn from their experiences and improve our own tactics, techniques and procedures,” said Jeffrey R. Johnson, NNSA’s Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security.

Click here to see the Marines and protective force in action. In the video, both speakers use the term CQB, which means close quarters battle.