National Nuclear Security Administration

NNSA taps into university consortia to advance nuclear science

July 5, 2018

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Professor S. Jack Hu, Vice President for Research at University of Michigan, welcomed participants to the University Program Review.
Professor S. Jack Hu, Vice President for Research at University of Michigan, welcomed participants to the University Program Review.
University of Michigan
Consortia program directors present NNSA Administrator Ms. Lisa E. Gordon-Hagerty with a plaque signed by students for NNSA’s support of university research and education programs in nuclear security and nonproliferation.
Consortia program directors present NNSA Administrator Lisa E. Gordon-Hagerty with a plaque signed by students for NNSA’s support of university research and education programs in nuclear security and nonproliferation.
University of Michigan

NNSA is committed to developing future experts in nuclear science and security by linking basic university research with the expertise found at Department of Energy and NNSA’s National Laboratories.

NNSA’s Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development funds three university-lab consortia that met last month during the annual University Program Review in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT), led by the University of Michigan, hosted the event.

The event assembled more than 280 attendees including many from the three consortia: the Nuclear Science and Security Consortium, led by University of California, Berkeley; the Consortium for Nonproliferation Enabling Capabilities, led by North Carolina State University; and the Consortium for Verification Technology, led by the University of Michigan.

Working together, these organizations provide the research and development and scientific expertise needed to address technology and policy issues in nuclear security, nonproliferation, and treaty-compliance monitoring.

Through the consortia, NNSA directly funds 26 universities and facilitates collaboration with 10 National Laboratories and sites. Each consortium offers seminars, education programs, and research opportunities that reach universities across the nation, including minority-serving institutions.

Additionally, the partnership with laboratory scientists provides consortium participants with a direct link to expertise and capabilities specific to the research being conducted by university professors, students, and researchers. Collaboration often takes place through direct mentorship opportunities during summer internships and fellowships.

The annual review provides a venue for students and collaborating scientists to showcase their research, and allow programmatic oversight and technical interchange between student researchers, early career scientists, National Laboratories, small business, and government research managers.

 

Students from each consortium and a small business presented research outcomes during a featured poster session to NNSA Administrator Lisa E. Gordon-Hagerty and others.
Students from each consortium and a small business presented research outcomes during a featured poster session to NNSA Administrator Lisa E. Gordon-Hagerty and others.
University of Michigan