Audit Report: DOE-OIG-20-46

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July 6, 2020

The Department of Energy’s Federal Employee Substance Abuse Testing Program

Department of Energy Order 343.1, Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program, establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the Department’s Program, which covers drug testing.  The Director, Office of Human Capital Management implements and administers the Program.  The Departmental Substance Abuse Program Manager provides advice and guidance on policies, standards, and procedures, and maintains the substance abuse testing databases.  Local Substance Abuse Program Coordinators coordinate the scheduling of all testing for their offices; report positive drug test results to the Departmental Substance Abuse Program Manager; provide or secure training to managers and supervisors; and maintain local databases of employees who require testing.  Managers and supervisors ensure that employees are available and direct them to report for scheduled testing.  The Department has an interagency agreement with the Department of the Interior to provide for the collection, testing, and medical review of drug testing by private contractors.

The Order states that all Federal employees who are in TDPs (i.e., hold security clearances or hold position categories such as Public Health and Safety, Presidential Appointees, and Law Enforcement) are subject to an annual 30 percent random drug testing rate.  The Department is comprised of approximately 13,000 Federal employees, including approximately 6,400 positions that meet the 30 percent annual random drug testing rate criteria for TDP.

We initiated this audit to determine whether the Department is administering the Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program, as required.  We found that the Department had not always administered the Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program, as required by Department of Energy Order 343.1, Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program.  Based on our analysis, we determined that the Department did not meet the annual random drug testing rate for Testing Designated Position Federal employees.  In addition, we found that Local Substance Abuse Program Coordinators did not always ensure that random drug testing was conducted.  Finally, we identified issues related to Testing Designated Position documentation, annual reporting, and training.

These conditions occurred, in part, because of internal control weaknesses within the Program.  Specifically, we noted that the Departmental Substance Abuse Program Manager did not verify that employees selected for testing were actually tested, did not maintain records of employees selected for testing, and did not ensure that Local Substance Abuse Program Coordinators were fully aware of their responsibilities.  As a result, the Department cannot ensure that it can effectively and consistently implement a Program aimed at achieving a drug-free workplace.  We made recommendations to help improve the Department’s management of its Program.

Topic: Management & Administration