You are here

Through its partnerships with state and territory energy offices, the State Energy Program (SEP) collects annual cost, energy savings, and other related non-energy benefits that come from its financial and technical assistance to states. These states routinely use SEP funding and technical assistance as a starting point, adding their own funds and leveraging investments from the private sector for energy projects. Learn about the latest SEP Success Stories

PUBLICATIONS

Read the following publications for more in-depth information about SEP’s impacts.

State Energy Program National Evaluation of Program Operations for Program Year 2008
Source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2014
The purpose of the SEP National Evaluation was to develop independent estimates of key program outcomes for Program Year 2008 and for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) period (2009-2013).
 
The U.S. State Energy Program In Brief
Source: National Association of State Energy Officials, 2014
This fact sheet provides a summary of SEP, highlighting its mission, goals, cost savings, economic impacts, groundbreaking efforts across the nation made possible thanks to SEP funding, and more.
 
U.S. State Energy Program in Review: An Update From the 56 State and Territory Energy Offices
Source: National Association of State Energy Officials, 2012
This report highlights energy projects from every state and overseas U.S. territory in 2012.
 
U.S. State Energy Program: An Activity Report of State Energy Program Success Stories from State and Territory Energy Offices 2011
Source: National Association of State Energy Officials, 2011
This report highlights energy projects from every state and overseas U.S. territory in 2011.
 
The State Energy Program: Building Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Capacity in the States
Source: National Association of State Energy Officials, 2010
This study documents the capacity-building effects that SEP has had on the states’ capacity to design, manage, and implement energy efficiency and renewable energy programs based on 68 interviews with 40 current and former state energy officials in 24 states. The study finds that SEP has made a critical contribution to existing state capacity, setting the platform from which future state efforts can be launched.