Selections include demonstrations of some of the world's first clean hydrogen-fueled direct reduced ironmaking facilities, which can help eliminate the vast majority of steelmaking emissions

The U.S. Department of Energy recently announced up to $6 billion for 33 projects across more than 20 states to decarbonize energy-intensive industries, reduce industrial greenhouse gas emissions, support good-paying union jobs, revitalize industrial communities, and strengthen the nation's manufacturing competitiveness. These projects will focus on the highest emitting industries where decarbonization technologies will have the greatest impact, including iron and steel, cement and concrete, chemicals and refining, and more.

The selected iron and steel projects plan to demonstrate emerging technologies, including some of the world's first clean hydrogen-fueled direct reduced ironmaking facilities, which can eliminate the vast majority of steelmaking emissions. Clean hydrogen demonstrations include:

  • Hydrogen-Fueled Zero Emissions Steel Making—Perry County, Mississippi (Federal Cost Share: up to $500 million)

Led by SSAB, this project will build the first commercial-scale facility in the world using HYBRIT, a fossil-free direct reduced iron (DRI) technology using 100% hydrogen. The project also plans to expand SSAB's Montpelier, Iowa, steelmaking facility to utilize the resulting hydrogen-reduced DRI. This project aims to generate an estimated 6,000 construction jobs and 540 permanent jobs.

  • Hydrogen-Ready Direct Reduced Iron Plant and Electric Melting Furnace Installation—Middletown, Ohio (Federal Cost Share: up to $500 million)

Led by Cleveland-Cliffs Steel Corporation, this project includes plans to install a hydrogen-ready flex-fuel DRI plant and two electric melting furnaces at Cleveland-Cliffs' Middletown Works mill in Ohio. The project would lead to an estimated one million tons of greenhouse gas emissions reductions per year. In addition, this project aims to demonstrate key hydrogen-based ironmaking technology while simultaneously leading to the replacement of one of Cleveland-Cliffs' seven operating blast furnaces. The project anticipates creating 170 permanent jobs and 1,200 temporary union construction jobs, while preserving the site's existing 2,500 jobs—including 2,000 from the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.

Read more about this announcement.