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Interested applicants can learn more about the application process on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's ETIPP Technical Assistance Application page.

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About ETIPP

ETIPP Partner Network

ETIPP Communities

 

Discover more tools and resources from the Energy Transitions Initiative.

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Transitions Initiative Partnership Project (ETIPP) works alongside remote, island, and islanded communities to transform their energy systems and increase energy resilience through strategic energy planning and the implementation of solutions that address their specific challenges. 

ETIPP defines remote, island, or islanded communities as follows:

  • Remote communities are isolated from population centers and as a result, have limited access to centralized energy systems.
     
  • Island communities are isolated from the mainland by waterways.
     
  • Islanded communities are not grid-tied to large transmission-scale power systems and as a result, experience frequent issues with power quality or reliability. These communities may or may not be categorized as "remote" or "island."

Below are the competitively selected communities currently participating in ETIPP, with an anticipated 12- to 18-month project per community.
 

Alaska Longline Fishermen's Association (ALFA), Sitka, Alaska

Alaska Longline Fishermen's Association satellite image

Alaska Longline Fishermen's Association

ETIPP is helping ALFA retrofit two fishing vessels for hybrid power generation and assess potential paths to carbon-free fishing. This effort will help reduce a key cost for ALFA's operation by reducing fuel consumption and mitigate a key vulnerability for the fishing industry by reducing carbon emissions.

Dillingham, Alaska

Dillingham, Alaska, Satellite Image

Dillingham, Alaska

Home to the largest salmon river run worldwide, the Nuyakuk River is a significant natural and economic resource for Dillingham residents and five nearby Alaska Native villages. ETIPP is producing an economic model and decision support tool to help the Nushagak Electric and Telephone Company assess the potential impacts of river hydropower on local fisheries and tribal, residential, and commercial diesel fuel consumption.

Eastport, Maine

Eastport, Maine, Satellite Image

Eastport, Maine

The city of Eastport is composed entirely of islands. ETIPP is performing a techno-economic analysis to help plan, site, and optimally size a community-scale microgrid for Eastport that draws baseload support from a marine hydrokinetic device. City leaders, along with Ocean Renewable Power Company, Inc., are working with ETIPP experts to ensure the project increases Eastport's energy resilience and leverages its huge tidal energy potential.

Honolulu, Hawaii

Honolulu, Hawaii, Satellite Image

Honolulu, Hawaii

ETIPP is working with Honolulu and the Hawaiian Electric Company to evaluate optimal hybrid microgrid locations and identify potential microgrid participants to improve electrical infrastructure resilience to severe weather. The project will also produce a hybrid microgrid opportunity map that demonstrates distributed energy resource availability for future planning.

Islesboro, Maine

Islesboro, Maine, Satellite Image

Islesboro, Maine

The island of Islesboro relies on the mainland for electricity and experiences regular energy outages due to extreme weather. The Islesboro Energy Committee wants to identify local, resilient, and low-cost modes of energy production that will help the island achieve 100% fossil-free energy by 2030 and from which all residents can equitably benefit. ETIPP is performing a techno-economic analysis to identify optimal renewable energy pathways by which Islesboro can reach its goal.

Kauai, Hawaii

Kauai, Hawaii, Satellite Image

Kauai, Hawaii

Natural disaster vulnerabilities and high energy costs have motivated Kauai to replace its fossil fuel-based ground transportation sector with clean, convenient mobility options for residents and visitors by 2045. ETIPP is helping Kauai achieve this goal by designing a mobility data system to inform long-term travel planning, and drafting a report on the feasibility and distribution of electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

Nags Head, North Carolina

Nags Head, North Carolina, Satellite Image

Nags Head, North Carolina

Located in the Outer Banks region—a seasonal tourism destination—the town of Nags Head experiences frequent extreme weather events that disrupt town operations and threaten the safety of residents. ETIPP is evaluating energy efficiency opportunities for municipal buildings and estimating microgrid viability and size according to the local utility's energy management processes. The project will help Nags Head increase the disaster resilience of its critical facilities by planning for 48 to 72 hours of backup power.

Ocracoke Island, North Carolina

Ocracoke Island, North Carolina, Satellite Image

Ocracoke Island, North Carolina

Ocracoke depends on the reliable operation of its ferry vessels to transport people and goods, and these operations are complicated by frequent severe weather on the Outer Banks. Tideland Electric Membership Corporation (EMC), the island's utility provider, wants to understand the impacts of potential ferry electrification on operations. ETIPP is performing a feasibility and cost-benefit analysis of hybrid, electric, and other low-carbon ferry technologies to help Tideland EMC and North Carolina Department of Transportation plan for strategic infrastructure investments.

Ouzinkie, Alaska

Ouzinkie, Alaska, Satellite Image

Ouzinkie, Alaska

The village of Ouzinkie is located on Spruce Island and powered by diesel generators and an aging hydroelectric power system. ETIPP is providing a techno-economic analysis to identify optimal improvements to the Ouzinkie power system. Results will help the community prioritize investments in distributed energy resources and provide the documentation required for future grant or loan applications.

Sitka, Alaska

Sitka, Alaska, Satellite Image

Sitka, Alaska

Sitka is powered by seasonal lake hydropower and a diesel microgrid operated by a community-owned electric utility. Energy demands in Sitka are driven by high heating requirements, intensive hospital activities, and the seasonal fishing industry. ETIPP is developing a model and training materials for the Sitka grid, assessing energy potential from solar, wind and ocean sources, and evaluating green energy export options to help Sitka reduce its carbon footprint and optimize its microgrid.

Wainwright, Alaska

Wainwright, Alaska, Satellite Image

Wainwright, Alaska

Wainwright is a village in the Arctic Circle with approximately 500 residents, the majority of which are Alaska Native. The village is powered entirely by diesel and isolated from external grid resources. ETIPP is helping Wainwright evaluate opportunities to incorporate renewable energy and storage in an ongoing energy-efficiency retrofit of a 1,500-square-foot community center to achieve net-zero energy status for the building. This project will support Wainwright's larger goal of employing energy efficiency measures and renewable power to decrease its reliance on diesel and increase its resilience.

Contact

If you have questions about ETIPP, contact eti@ee.doe.gov.