Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

Running the Race for Clean Energy

September 16, 2015

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Through the Energy Department's Climate Action Champions initiative, cities like Boston and Minneapolis have identified ways to reduce their carbon footprint by as much as 80 percent by 2050.

Through the Energy Department's Climate Action Champions initiative, cities like Boston and Minneapolis have identified ways to reduce their carbon footprint by as much as 80 percent by 2050.

The White House has launched a Climate Action Champions Initiative to recognize local heroes who are devoted to carbon reduction and the resulting weather extremes resulting from climate change – from droughts and wildfires to fierce storms and rising sea levels. 16 models of proactive change were selected last fall from among cities, counties and tribes, comprising more than 150 communities nationwide. Each Champion has demonstrated practical strategies to boost energy efficiency, harness renewable power and build resilience in their communities. The result is that cities like Boston and Minneapolis have identified ways to reduce their carbon footprint by as much as 80 percent by 2050.

In support of this initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy this month competitively selected ten Climate Action Champions that will collectively receive up to $800,000 in technical assistance to push the frontiers of climate action. These recipients are finding practical ways to pursue their targets, like exploring advanced microgrids, innovating financing programs to fund climate resiliency, and creating climate-smart building codes. Further, federal leverage can help communities to incorporate smartgrid technologies and FEMA-supported resilience exercises to prepare for extreme weather events. All ten recipients are working collaboratively to achieve ambitious goals:

Learn more about Climate Action Champions Initiative or view the latest White House Press Release.