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A school classroom in Greensburg, Kansas. Educators from schools across the country will meet on January 26 in Washington, D.C., for the National Energy Education Summit. | Photo courtesy of McCownGordon Construction

A school classroom in Greensburg, Kansas. Educators from schools across the country will meet on January 26 in Washington, D.C., for the National Energy Education Summit. | Photo courtesy of McCownGordon Construction

Did you know that the United Nations named 2015 the international year of light? Last year’s Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for the invention of improved light-emitting diodes, better known as LED lamps. Yet, many people switch on the lights without knowing where the electricity comes from, how it is made, or the impacts of their energy-use decisions.

On January 26, energy educators from across the country will convene in Washington, D.C., to address the need for nationwide energy literacy. Join us for the National Energy Education Summit, hosted by the Council of Energy Research and Education Leaders. You still have time to register and join the conversation about how to teach and collaborate on energy.

The event will bring together energy and climate education thought leaders to discuss new strategies for increasing public understanding of energy. Improved energy literacy can help citizens make informed energy use decisions and educate the next generation of policy makers and technology innovators. In addition, the new energy economy will need a workforce with improved skills and knowledge.

The conference will feature presenters, posters, symposia, and workshops on a variety of energy education topics (see full list), including these two sessions co-organized by the Energy Department:

  • Energizing Energy and Climate EducationThis symposium will focus on actions to achieve the goals of improving energy and climate literacy, enhancing access to existing resources, and incorporating social media in our strategies.

Register and find more information about the summit. Join the conversation on social media using #energyliteracy and #energyedsummit to tell us what you think are the critical challenges in energy education.  

Learn more about the Energy Department’s Energy Literacy Initiative, which includes a course framework (also available in Spanish) for all grade levels and a series of videos to help educators think about the interdisciplinary nature of energy. Post-secondary energy educators can also get involved in the Energy 101 Initiative, which seeks to increase student opportunities to enter the energy workforce.