Office of Economic Impact and Diversity

Women @ Energy: Mandy Rominsky

August 25, 2015

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Mandy Rominsky is an applications physicist / Fermilab Test Beam Facility coordinator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). She attended New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, where she earned a bachelor of science degree in physics, and the University of Oklahoma, where she earned a Ph.D in physics.

Mandy Rominsky is an applications physicist / Fermilab Test Beam Facility coordinator at Fermilab. She attended New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, where she earned a bachelor of science degree in physics, and the University of Oklahoma, where she earned a Ph.D in physics.

1) What inspired you to work in STEM?

I always asked questions about the world around me. I knew I wanted to be a scientist as early as middle school. I then specialized in physics in high school and high-energy physics when I was an undergrad.

2) What excites you about your work at the Department of Energy?

I get to work with such a variety of scientists and scientific equipment. The Test Beam Facility serves an important role in the field of high-energy physics. It allows people to come and work on developing new particle detector technologies that will help us with future experiments, ultimately advancing our understanding of the universe.

3) How can our country engage more women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in STEM?

I think there are a million ways to engage girls in STEM fields. I think that part of the problem is some girls feeling like to succeed in science they need to be straight A students, which isn’t true. I think that having appropriate support for women with families will help a lot in this country. When you have to decide if you are going to have a family or pursue a Ph.D, that’s going to lose girls. 

4) Do you have tips you'd recommend for someone looking to enter your field of work?

Believe in what you do. This isn’t easy to do, but it’s achievable. It’s important work. The people you meet and the skills you learn are worth it, even if you don’t end up with a job in this field of research. There are many other areas in which you can apply your learned skills.

5) When you have free time, what are your hobbies?

I like to work on different artistic projects (sketching, cross-stitching, etc) and spend time with my kids. I also like to go hiking.