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With their presence in almost every neighborhood and community, refuse trucks, like the one shown above, can benefit from alternative fuels and advanced technology. | Photo courtesy of Veolia Environmental Services.

With their presence in almost every neighborhood and community, refuse trucks, like the one shown above, can benefit from alternative fuels and advanced technology. | Photo courtesy of Veolia Environmental Services.

With a total of 18 members that run more than a million vehicles across the country, the National Clean Fleets Partnership addresses a wide variety of transportation needs.  The program, part of the Vehicle Technologies Program’s Clean Cities initiative, works to help partners reduce their vehicle fleet’s petroleum use, whether they use telecommunications repair vans or soda delivery trucks.  With Secretary Chu’s announcement on Monday of the Partnership’s expansion, this is the second of two posts highlighting our four new members.

Veolia Environmental Services

With their presence in almost every neighborhood and community, refuse trucks can benefit from alternative fuels and advanced technology, which this National Partner knows well.  The Solid Waste division of Veolia Environmental Services maintains a fleet of more than 3,000 trucks, heavy equipment, and support vehicles that service both households and businesses. The company is dedicated to reducing petroleum use and emissions through route optimization, alternative fuels, and hybrid vehicles. As of 2012, the company operates four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations and more than 100 CNG refuse-collection and support vehicles. Veolia joined the partnership in December 2011.

Johnson Controls, Inc. 

As a leading supplier of battery systems for hybrid electric vehicles, Johnson Controls is committed to designing and delivering increasingly sustainable products, services and solutions that will help its customers improve their energy efficiency, reduce their carbon footprint, and achieve their environmental goals. Leading by example, Johnson Controls has implemented several greenhouse gas reduction strategies in its global fleet of 19,000 vehicles. It first introduced hybrid electric vehicles into its fleet in 2009. Today, it operates more than 500 hybrids, each reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 30%, and together saving $500,000 in fuel costs during the first two-and-a-half years of operation. In 2011, it deployed 20 all-electric vans, which are estimated to achieve a 61% GHG reduction per vehicle. Other strategies include the use of CNG vans, and higher MPG vans and trucks. In 2012, Johnson Controls will pilot the use of telematics —allowing them to better collect and share geographic and other data with drivers—and continue with the deployment of additional alternative fuel vehicles, including propane-fueled units. Johnson Controls joined the partnership in February 2012.