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January 29, 2014
A team from the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management observes equipment that will be used to retrieve highly radioactive sludge at the Hanford site. This pump was modified to fit the underwater environment where the sludge is stored.
Hanford Site Shares Lessons Learned in Retrieving Highly Radioactive Material

RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office (Richland) and its contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL), welcomed staff from the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management Transuranic (TRU) waste processing team in Tennessee to the Hanford site recently to share lessons learned in the retrieval and processing of highly radioactive material, called sludge.

January 29, 2014
2014 Annual Planning Summary for the Richland Operations Office and the Office of River Protection

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2014 and 2015 within the Richland Operations Office and the Office of River Protection.

January 22, 2014
Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford’s 300 Area

RICHLAND, WA – Hanford’s River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

December 24, 2013
The concrete “core” is removed from Tank C-105 after workers cut a 55-inch hole in the tank dome.
Cleanup Progresses at the Office of River Protection

RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Office of River Protection’s (ORP) mission continues: to retrieve, treat and dispose of the 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical waste stored in large, underground tanks. In 2013, ORP maintained steady progress toward the successful completion of its mission.

December 24, 2013
Workers sample a well used to monitor groundwater at the Hanford site.
EM’s Richland Operations Office Celebrates Disposal Achievement in 2013

RICHLAND, Wash. – EM's Richland Operations Office's 2013 accomplishments ranged from cleaning up buildings and waste sites to treating a record amount of groundwater.

December 18, 2013
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory study the microbial interactions in the plant root systems, the rhizosphere. The rhizosphere represents a critical zone where plant roots, microbes and minerals interface, and where biogeochemical weathering provides nutrients to plants. This research program will broaden our understanding of the biogeochemistry of plant-microbe-soil interactions. Shown are the spores of an opportunistic soil fungus Penicillium sp. that associates with the plant roots, microbial biofilms and soil minerals. | Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
Photo of the Week: Studying the Rhizosphere

Check out our favorite energy-related photos!

December 13, 2013
Record of Decision Issued for the Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS

The U.S. Department of Energy has issued the first in a series of Records of Decision (RODs) pursuant to the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC&WM EIS, DOE/EIS-0391, December 2012).

December 13, 2013
EIS-0391: Record of Decision

Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

November 26, 2013
A composite image comprised of dozens of photos taken inside C-110 provides a rare panoramic view of the tank interior. Portions of the tank floor and the FoldTrack waste-retrieval system are clearly visible.
Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM’s Hanford Site

Operators use multiple technologies to remove waste from underground storage tank

November 14, 2013
At the Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), researchers are using two modular homes to test energy-efficient products and calculate their energy savings. Researchers test new technologies in the Experimental home (pictured above), while the Baseline home (not pictured) serves as a control and doesn’t get changed during any of the experiments. | Photo courtesy of PNNL.
PNNL’s Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the Paces

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are testing how new building technologies work and calculating their energy savings.