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Hydrogen

January 27, 2015
The Hyundai Tuscon FCEV is currently available for lease in Southern California for less than $500 per month, including free hydrogen fuel. Hydrogen for FCEVs can be produced from a variety of resources all providing emission reductions. Hydrogen derived from natural gas reduces emissions by half and hydrogen produced from renewables cuts total emissions by more than 90% compared to today’s gasoline vehicle. Comparable to today’s gas prices, hydrogen can be produced from low-cost natural gas for approximately $4 per gallon gasoline equivalent when produced at high volumes. | Photo by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department
Washington Auto Show Spotlight: How Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Work

Fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are quickly becoming a commercially viable sustainable transportation option for Americans. Unlike gasoline-powered cars, these cutting-edge vehicles are fueled by hydrogen and emit only water. The latest and greatest FCEVs are on display this week at the Washington Auto Show. Learn more about how FCEVs work and what the Energy Department is doing to make them even more energy efficient and cost effective.

January 23, 2015
The Future is Now for Advanced Vehicles

Go behind the scenes at the Washington Auto Show, where the next generation of advanced vehicles is here today.

January 9, 2015
Fuel Cell Technologies Office Reaches Major Patent Milestone

Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity to buildings and power for vehicles while emitting nothing but water. The Energy Department’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, supports research and development (R&D) that improves the performance and lowers the cost of these systems. The office recently reached a major milestone, with 500 patents resulting from FCTO-supported R&D.

December 10, 2014
A fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) at a fueling station in California. New Energy Department reports signal rapid growth in America’s fuel cell and hydrogen industry as FCEVs are introduced to the market. | Energy Department photo
First Commercially Available Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Hit the Street

Fuel cell electric vehicles are now widely available in the United States. These passenger vehicles have the driving range, ease of refueling, and performance of today’s gasoline-powered cars while emitting nothing but water.

November 10, 2014
The EERE-funded Solar Thermochemical Advanced Reactor System converts natural gas and sunlight into a more energy-rich fuel called syngas, which power plants can burn to make electricity.
Six EERE-funded projects recognized with R&D 100 Awards

Widely recognized as the “Oscars of Invention,” the 52nd R&D 100 Awards ceremony took place last week. These awards identify and honor major technological breakthroughs each year. The categories cover industry, academia, and government research. This year, EERE-funded projects won six awards across four of our technology areas: Bioenergy, Fuel Cells/Solar, and Vehicles.

September 30, 2014
Developed by Sandia National Laboratories and several industry partners, the fuel cell mobile light (H2LT) offers a cleaner, quieter alternative to diesel-powered units. As seen here, the system has been used by airport construction personnel at San Francisco International Airport and in other applications. | Photo by Dino Vournas.
And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to…. Lighting Up Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology

An Energy Department-supported project is addressing these problems by designing, building, and testing a mobile lighting tower powered by hydrogen fuel cell technology, which is quiet and emits nothing but water while generating electricity.

September 26, 2014
Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman test drove the Hyundai Tucson Fuel Cell vehicle when the car made an appearance at the Department of Energy headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Hyundai Tucson Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle visits Department of Energy

From researchers to project managers to technical experts, there are dozens of EERE staff dedicated to supporting the research, development, and deployment of fuel cells. Thus, we were excited to test drive the Hyundai Tucson Fuel Cell vehicle when the car made an appearance at the Department of Energy headquarters in Washington, D.C.

September 11, 2014
A fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) in Hawaii. Engineers from Idaho National Laboratory and National Renewable Energy Laboratory identified a new way to launch economically viable hydrogen fueling stations for FCEVs in Honolulu. | Photo by Michael Penev, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Highlighting Hydrogen: Hawaii’s Success with Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Offers Opportunity Nationwide

Engineers from the Energy Department’s Idaho National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory identified a new way to launch economically viable hydrogen fueling stations for FCEVs in Honolulu, Hawaii, based on a report titled “Hydrogen Fueling Station in Honolulu, Hawaii.” The report’s findings could also have a broad national impact, accelerating the pace of America's growing clean energy economy.

July 17, 2014
Alternative Fuels Used in Transportation (5 Activities)

Gasoline is the most commonly used fuel for transportation; however, there are multiple alternative fuels that are making their way to the market. These alternative fuels include propane, natural gas, electric hybrids, hydrogen fuel cells, and bio-diesel. Students will probably have heard of some of these alternative fuels, but they may not understand how and why they are better then ordinary gasoline.