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Recent News from the National Labs

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April 24, 2014
Longfellow Middle School from Falls Church, Virginia and Hopkins Junior High from Fremont, California, compete in the final academics round for the championship during the 2012 National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. | Photograph by Jack Dempsey, U.S. Department of Energy.
Science Bowl 2014: Future STEM Leaders to Compete in National Contest

This weekend, high school and middle school students from across the country will visit Washington, DC, for the 24th annual National Science Bowl.

April 24, 2014
Jump-Starting Zero Energy Home Design and Student Careers

A new Energy Department student competition moves sustainable home design forward while providing students with experience for clean energy careers.

April 22, 2014
All Earth Day long, Secretary Moniz will be sharing behind-the-scenes photos from his Earth Day trip to Boston. Follow along at <a href="http://instagram.com/energy">instagram.com/energy</a>. | Graphic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department.
Secretary Moniz is Taking Over Our Instagram

Secretary Moniz is in Boston for Earth Day, highlighting the Energy Department’s work to fight climate change. Follow along on Instagram for behind-the-scenes photos!

April 21, 2014
Video: Secretary Moniz Loosens Up For Earth Day Pitch

Secretary Moniz will join EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy at Fenway Park to throw out the first pitch at this year's Red Sox Earth Day game. Luckily, he's been practicing.

April 21, 2014
#ActOnClimate: It's Earth Week on Energy.gov

We're kicking off Earth Week on Energy.gov! Learn how climate change may be affecting energy supplies and infrastructure near you.

April 18, 2014
What do poplar trees have to do with climate change?
 
In addition to their status as a fast-growing candidate for biofuels production, poplar trees play an important role in influencing plant and animal communities in forest ecosystems. By studying the genetic variants in poplar trees, researchers are working to better understand the impacts of climate change -- and working to develop specific strains of poplars for various applications, like biofuel production.
 
In 2006, researchers at the Energy Department’s Joint Genome Institute led the effort to successfully sequence the genome of the poplar tree. They now have identified the candidate genes that will help domesticate poplar for biomass and reduce the cost of biofuel production. | Photo courtesy of the DOE Joint Genome Institute.
Photo of the Week: Sequencing the Genome of the Poplar Tree

Check out our favorite energy-related photos!

April 16, 2014
Power lines carry electricity across Washington State. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department.
How Synchrophasors are Bringing the Grid into the 21st Century

Learn about synchrophasors and how they are helping grid operators keep power flowing reliably to American homes and businesses.

April 15, 2014
#LabChat: The Science of the Very Small

Join us this Thursday at noon ET on Twitter as scientists from three of the Energy Department's National Labs explore the science of the very small -- nanotechnology.

April 14, 2014
The Solenoidal Tracker at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a detector which specializes in tracking the thousands of particles produced by each ion collision at RHIC. Weighing 1,200 tons and as large as a house, STAR is a massive detector. It is used to search for signatures of the form of matter that RHIC was designed to create: the quark-gluon plasma. It is also used to investigate the behavior of matter at high energy densities by making measurements over a large area. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab.
Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Brookhaven National Laboratory

From nuclear physics to nano-science and beyond, Brookhaven National Lab is conducting game changing research on the frontiers of scientific innovation.

April 11, 2014
The cyclotron, invented by Ernest Lawrence in the 1930s, is a unique circular particle accelerator, which Lawrence himself referred to as a "proton merry-go-round." In reality, the cyclotron specialized in smashing atoms. Part of this atom-smashing process requires very large, very heavy magnets -- sometimes weighing up to 220 tons. In this photo, workers at the Federal Telegraph facility in Menlo Park, California, are smoothing two castings for 80-ton magnets for use in one of Lawrence's cyclotrons at the University of California, Berkeley. Lawrence passed away in 1958 -- and just 23 days later, the Regents of the University of California voted to rename two of the university's nuclear research sites: Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
Photo of the Week: Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets

Check out our favorite energy-related photos!