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U.S.-India Energy Cooperation

In November 2009, Prime Minister Singh and President Obama agreed to strengthen U.S.-India energy cooperation through a new Partnership to Advance Clean Energy (PACE) under the U.S.-India Energy Dialogue.

In November 2009, Prime Minister Singh and President Obama agreed to strengthen U.S.-India energy cooperation through a new Partnership to Advance Clean Energy (PACE) under the U.S.-India Energy Dialogue.

U.S.-India Energy Dialogue

The United States and India share a rich history of energy cooperation going back to the 1950s, including USAID’s support for India’s first nuclear power plant at Tarapur in 1969 and the launch of DOE’s deep engagement with India following then Secretary of Energy Hazel O’Leary’s 1994 Presidential Mission on Sustainable Energy and Trade. This cooperation has expanded over time as concerns over energy security and the climate impact of carbon emissions pushed energy to the top of the U.S.-India agenda. This culminated in the launch in May 2005 of the U.S.-India Energy Dialogue – a mechanism for policy dialogue and technical cooperation designed to enhance mutual energy security, promote increased energy trade and investment, facilitate the deployment of clean energy technologies, and advance non-proliferation goals, including the safe use of nuclear power.

Led by the U.S. Secretary of Energy and the Deputy Chairman of the Indian Planning Commission, the U.S.-India Energy Dialogue is a genuine “whole-of-government” undertaking that provides a high-level platform for engagement by a diverse array of governmental bodies from both countries. The two governments also actively engage with the Indian and American business communities to promote trade and investment in the energy sector. Work under the Energy Dialogue is organized under six working groups – Power and Energy Efficiency, New Technology and Renewable Energy, Coal, Oil and Gas, and Civil Nuclear Energy; the sixth, the Working Group on Sustainable Growth was added in May 2013.

U.S.-India Partnership to Advance Clean Energy

In November 2009, Prime Minister Singh and President Obama agreed to strengthen U.S.-India energy cooperation through a new Partnership to Advance Clean Energy (PACE) under the U.S.-India Energy Dialogue. PACE is the flagship program between the U.S. and India to work jointly on energy security and clean energy. PACE focuses on accelerating the transition to high-performing, low emissions, and energy-secure economies. It aims to bolster joint efforts to demonstrate the viability of existing clean energy technologies as well as identify new technologies that can increase energy access and security. PACE also focuses on engaging the private sector, local governments, industries, and other stakeholders in sharing best practices on sustainable low carbon growth. Since its inception, PACE has mobilized significant resources from both governments and the private sector to promote clean energy scale-up. Working under the auspices of the U.S.-India Energy Dialogue, PACE is an interagency effort that combines
the resources of several U.S. agencies.

PACE includes both a research component funded by DOE and the Indian Ministry of Science and Technology – the U.S.-India Joint Clean Energy R&D Center (JCERDC, also referred to as PACE-R) – and an interagency deployment component (PACE-D). In fall 2012, under the first ever joint Funding Opportunity Announcement between DOE and a foreign government, DOE and the Ministry of Science and Technology awarded funding to the three PACE-R consortia in the areas of:

  1. Solar energy;
  2. Energy efficiency of buildings; and
  3. Second-generation biofuels.

DOE and the Indian Government have each committed $25 million (subject to appropriations) over five years to support work by the PACE-R teams of scientists and engineers. Consortia members have pledged an additional $75 million in matching private funds.