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Clean Energy Ministerial

Energy ministers and high-level delegates gathered for the Seventh Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM7) in San Francisco, California, U.S.A. on June 1-2, 2016. Photo courtesy of the CEM Secretariat.

Energy ministers and high-level delegates gathered for the Seventh Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM7) in San Francisco, California, U.S.A. on June 1-2, 2016. Photo courtesy of the CEM Secretariat.

The Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) is a partnership of the world's economies working together to accelerate the global clean energy transition.

The CEM works to advance a broad range of clean energy activities that include improving energy efficiency, expanding clean energy supply, supporting energy system transformation, and enhancing human capacity.

The 24 countries and the European Commission that are members of the CEM represent about 90% of global clean energy investment and 75% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Members are Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Denmark, the European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Norway, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

The CEM pairs the high-level political engagement of energy ministers and other high-level officials with year-round initiatives and campaigns to provide a powerful combination for accelerating clean energy policy and technology development. The CEM is a bottom-up, voluntary, and collaborative forum with member countries proposing and working on initiatives and campaigns that help them achieve their own national clean energy goals and priorities but that also make a difference at the global level. CEM members also recognize that their efforts benefit from the active involvement and leadership of the private sector as well as international and non-governmental organizations. This collaborative, multilateral approach enables proven policies, programs, and technologies to realize broader, faster, and lower-cost implementation and deployment among CEM and non-CEM countries. Over its six years, the CEM has accumulated an impressive record of accomplishments, delivering on-the-ground results and proving to be an effective and efficient implementation forum. As such, it is expected to play a critical role in helping countries achieve the clean energy and climate goals put forward as part of their Nationally Determined Contributions in the Paris Agreement. 

The CEM initiative and campaign work is organized under four thematic pillars: energy efficiency, clean energy supply, energy systems and integration, and crosscutting support. Current work is focused on appliance efficiency, commercial and industrial efficiency, solar and wind deployment, power system transformation, smart grids, electric vehicles, women in clean energy, energy access, and clean energy policy assistance.

The CEM formally launched in 2010 with the United States hosting the first ministerial meetings (CEM1). The United Arab Emirates hosted CEM2 in 2011, the United Kingdom CEM3 in 2012, India CEM4 in 2013, Korea CEM5 in 2014, Mexico CEM6 in June 2015, and the United States CEM7 in 2016. China will host CEM8 in 2017 and the European Commission has announced that, in cooperation with a member state, it will host CEM9 in 2018. 

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