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Water Power News

Below are news stories about conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Water Power Program, and other federal agencies.

Recent News

  • September 9, 2016

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) portfolio—commonly known as wave and tidal energy—is one of the more up-and-coming renewable energy sources being explored on an international scale. The United States is now seen by many as a global leader in developing MHK technology,

  • September 8, 2016

    The Energy Department's Wave Energy Prize teams are putting their devices in the water at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division in Bethesda, Maryland. Nine teams are assembling their devices onsite before testing them in the tank.

  • August 30, 2016

    The Energy Department today announced 10 organizations selected to receive more than $20 million in funding for new research, development, and demonstration projects that advance and monitor marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems, which generate electricity from ocean waves and tidal currents.

  • August 23, 2016

    As a major clean energy contributor, U.S. hydropower plays an important role today for both electricity generation and energy storage. For more than 100 years, U.S. hydropower has been an important source of low-cost, low-emissions renewable energy.

  • August 18, 2016

    In order to understand how fish swim through rivers, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed an injectable tracking device, known as an acoustic fish tag, with a self-charging battery. Funded by the Energy Department, this project is part of a long-term mission to contribute valuable research on fish migration through waterways when encountering hydroelectric dams. The key purpose of the study is to see whether or not fish become injured or hindered by the presence of hydroelectric devices.

  • August 16, 2016
    The Energy Department today announced up to $40 million in available funding, subject to congressional appropriations, to support the site selection, design, permitting, and construction of a national open-water, wave energy testing facility within U.S. federal or state waters. The Department anticipates the facility will contain at least three test berths to simultaneously and independently test wave energy devices.
  • July 26, 2016
    WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a new report looking at the future of hydropower through 2050. The report, Hydropower Vision: A New Chapter for America’s First Renewable Electricity Source, finds that with continued technology advancements, innovative market mechanisms, and a focus on environmental sustainability, hydropower in the United States (U.S.) could grow from 101 gigawatts (GW) to nearly 150 GW of combined electricity generation and storage capacity by 2050.
  • July 26, 2016

    The Energy Department's Water Power Program has issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) of $9.8 million for up to 12 projects to develop innovative technologies that will reduce capital costs and deployment timelines.

  • July 26, 2016

    Hydropower has been around for more than a century and is currently the nation's largest source of clean, domestic renewable electricity. Our new Hydropower Vision report explores how it could grow by 2050.

  • July 21, 2016
    The Energy Department’s Water Power Program intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to construct a national wave energy test facility inside U.S. federal or state waters. To support the full-scale testing of MHK wave energy devices, up to $40 million in funding will be provided to fund development and construction activities for a grid-connected wave test facility capable of independently and simultaneously testing at least three wave energy devices. Prospective applicants are encouraged to review the full notice of intent posted to EERE Exchange to learn more.
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