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Covered Product Category: Exterior Lighting

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for outdoor wall-mounted light fixtures or luminaires, outdoor pole/arm-mounted area and roadway luminaires, outdoor pole/arm-mounted decorative luminaires, fuel pump canopy luminaires, bollards, and parking garage luminaires, all of which are FEMP-designated product categories. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Exterior Lighting

The following table describes the efficiency requirements that exterior lighting must meet.

Table 1. Efficiency Requirements for Federal Purchases
Category Luminaire Efficacy Rating (LER)
Fuel pump canopy luminaires 70
Parking garage luminaires
Outdoor pole/arm-mounted area and roadway luminaires 65
Outdoor pole/arm-mounted decorative luminaires
Outdoor wall-mounted luminaires 60
Bollards 35

 

Defining the Covered Product

This FEMP-designated product category applies to exterior lighting applications used for general illumination.

Buyer Tips: Choosing the Right Technology

Typical light sources vary across the six categories of FEMP-designated exterior lighting product categories, and often include high-intensity discharge sources (which include high-pressure sodium [HPS] and metal halide [MH]). Other technologies include fluorescent, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), induction, and, more recently, light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Each of these lighting technologies has its own set of advantages and disadvantages, which may make it more or less attractive depending on the application.

Table 2. Common Exterior Lighting Technologies
Features Solid-state lighting (i.e., LED) High Intensity Discharge Fluorescent Induction
High Pressure Sodium Metal Halide Linear/U-Lamp Compact
Luminaire Efficacy Rating (LER) Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face.
Source/System Efficacy Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face.
System/Lamp Life Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face.
"White Light" Source Yes No, amber Yes Yes Yes Yes
Light Level Options Inherently Dimmable Bi-level only Bi-level only Can be dimmed Can be dimmed Bi-level via multiple lamps
Controllability Yes Bi-level Bi-level Yes Yes Bi-level
Initial Cost $$$ $ $ $ $ $$
Notes

LEDs are point light sources that can provide better uniformity compared to single lamps.

Lamp re-strike takes on to four minutes.

Lamp re-strike takes one to 15 minutes.

Fluorescent lamps require closer spacing for the same illumination levels compared to other sources.

Temperature sensitive

Induction lamps are "large" sources, which makes effective use of the lamp's light more difficult due to limitations of reflector geometry and optics.

Graphic of a smiley face. = Good $ = Lower 
Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. = Better $$ = Mid-range
Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. Graphic of a smiley face. = Best $$$ = Higher

 

The key to making an informed and cost-effective choice for each exterior lighting application is gathering the most accurate and relatable data on the performance, cost, and reliability of the products. If LED technology is identified as a viable option, pay attention to the performance criteria for comparing LED lighting with other technologies and products. Because LED technology is still developing, make sure you've gathered the information you need to make good decisions.

Products with verified performance are commonly listed when they meet specific criteria. A good resource is the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) LED Lighting Facts® program. LED Lighting Facts showcases LED products for general illumination from manufacturers who commit to testing products and reporting performance results according to industry standards. The program also provides information essential to evaluating products and identifying the best options. The site offers a search mechanism that allows users to sort on a variety of performance criteria. The DesignLights™ Consortium (DLC) is another good example of a program that lists products in certain luminaire categories that have verified performance. The DLC also has a search capability and has additional performance requirements to ensure high-quality products.

Complying with Contracting Requirements

These requirements apply to all forms of procurement, including construction guide specifications and project specifications; renovation, repair, maintenance, and energy service contracts; lease agreements; acquisitions made using purchase cards; and solicitations for offers. Energy efficiency requirements should be included in both the evaluation criteria of solicitations and the evaluations of solicitation responses.

Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Part 23.206 requires Federal agencies to insert the clause at FAR section 52.223-15 in solicitations and contracts that deliver, acquire, furnish, or specify energy-consuming products. FEMP recommends that agencies incorporate efficiency requirements into both the technical specification and evaluation sections of solicitations. Agencies may claim an exception to these requirements through a written finding that no ENERGY STAR–qualified or FEMP-designated product is available to meet the functional requirements, or that no such product is life-cycle cost effective for the specific application. Additional information on Federal requirements is available.

Finding More Information

The following resources provide additional information surrounding the purchase of efficient products:

Updated July 2012