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August 24, 2016
Clockwise from top left: A commercial airplane, a Navy aircraft carrier, and a researcher (photos courtesy of LanzaTech, the U.S. Navy, and the Energy Department, respectively). Commercial aviation, the U.S. military, and organic waste streams are all compelling opportunities for biofuel.
Who Needs Biofuels? Cost-Competitive Renewable Fuels are in Demand

A large part of the solution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector could be uniquely filled by biofuels and bioproducts. The Energy Department’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), in partnership with the national laboratories, academia, and private companies, is pursuing biofuel research and development to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and secure our energy independence.

August 17, 2016
A new White House report outlines the federal government’s plans to lower the cost of alternative jet fuel. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/44082489@N00/7762037662/">H. Michael Miley </a> via <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode">Creative Commons</a>.
Charting A Path for Sustainable Jet Fuels

A new White House report outlines the federal government’s plans to lower the cost of alternative jet fuel.

August 11, 2016
In June 2015, United Airlines announced a partnership with biofuel company Fulcrum BioEnergy to invest in future commercial-scale aviation biofuel plants. The company’s innovative technology converts household trash into low-cost, sustainable aviation biofuel. This investment adds to their agreement to purchase up to 15 million gallons of sustainable aviation biofuel from AltAir, over a three-year period. | <em>Photo courtesy of United Airlines</em>
Changing the Way We Fly: Biofuels Made from Waste Gases Reaching New Heights with Airline Industry

Booking a flight soon? You may be leaving on a plane powered by renewable bio-based jet fuel that was made from industrial waste gases.

August 5, 2016
2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Winning Team: (From left to right) Maria Zeitlin (advisor), Lexington Zografakis, Sydney Bracht, and Sidney Davis were recognized by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenergy Technologies Office. The team and their advisor from Smithtown High School East in St. James, New York, were recognized at the Bioenergy 2016 conference for their winning infographic “Cellulosic Ethanol: Fuel of the Future.”
Winning BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Students Recognized in Washington, D.C.

A team of students from New York were recognized in Washington, D.C., as the winners of the first national run of the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge, which provides high school students an opportunity to combine research, graphic design, and social media to learn about bioenergy and share their knowledge.

July 6, 2016
Come to Bioenergy 2016 to Support Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation

This summer, we’ll be gathering for our conference, Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation, on July 12–14, at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., in partnership with the Clean Energy Research & Education Foundation.

June 30, 2016
First-Ever Sustainable Transportation Summit to Talk Future of Transportation, Energy, and Mobility

The inaugural 2016 Sustainable Transportation Summit will serve as a forum to share ideas and perspectives on opportunities to accelerate the commercialization and deployment of advanced transportation technologies and smart mobility systems over the next decade.

June 27, 2016
The just-released 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology Review captures the exciting achievements of the field of algal biofuels, as well as articulates new challenges, lessons learned, and critical next steps. | Photo courtesy of Sapphire, Las Cruces
Release of the 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology Review Charts Path Forward for Algae

The 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology Review, which was just released today, captures the exciting achievements of the field of algal biofuels, as well as articulates new challenges, lessons learned, and critical next steps.

June 8, 2016
Energy crops planted for use at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Energy Department hosted a five-day Bioenergy Study Tour of the southeastern United States to highlight innovations that are bringing the region one step closer to a sustainable bioenergy industry.| Photos courtesy of DOE
Take a Tour of the Bioenergy Ecosystem in the Southeastern U.S.

The Energy Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) works to enable a sustainable bioenergy industry that protects natural resources and advances environmental, economic, and social benefits. BETO recently sponsored a five-day Bioenergy Study Tour of the southeastern United States to highlight innovations that are bringing the industry one step closer to these goals.

May 4, 2016
As part of the Co-Optimization of Fuels & Engines initiative, researchers are exploring synergies among new bio-based fuels, engines, powertrains, and fueling infrastructure. Image by Loren Stacks, Sandia National Laboratories
Co-Optimized Fuel-Engine Systems to Transform Our Nation’s Vehicles

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) recent Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines Initiative (Co-Optima) seeks to combine previously independent areas of biofuels and engine-combustion research and development to design new fuels and engines that are co-optimized—designed in tandem to maximize vehicle performance and carbon efficiency.

April 28, 2016
Non-food biomass such as the crop residue (the leftover material from crops like stalks, leaves, and husks of corn plants following harvest) pictured above can be converted to biofuels as well as high-value products such as plastics, chemicals, and fertilizers.
Integrating the Production of Biofuels and Bioproducts

A new biomass production strategy offers a more efficient, cost-effective, and integrated approach to the utilization of our nation’s biomass resources.

April 27, 2016
Rice hulls and other samples used for demonstrating the capabilities of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Rapid Biomass Analysis System. Researchers have found a way to produce silicon structures for lithium-ion batteries using rice husks. | Photo courtesy of NREL
From Rice Paddies to the Road: Transforming Rice Husks into Lithium-ion Anodes for Plug-in Electric Vehicles

Through a project supported by the Energy Department’s Vehicle Technologies Office, researchers at Stanford University have been able to produce silicon structures for lithium-ion batteries from rice husks, a waste product of this ubiquitous agricultural crop.

April 12, 2016
Improving Access to Energy-Rich Sugars. Ning Sun is part of a team of researchers in the Energy Department's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) Deconstruction Division exploring methods to pretreat biomass. | Image courtesy of JBEI
Harnessing Biotechnology to Accelerate Advanced Biofuels Production

Advances in synthetic biology—which involves engineering biological systems for new uses—can offer innovative solutions to improve advanced biofuel production. This, in turn, can speed up the development and commercialization of biofuels, making them attractive and affordable to industrial manufacturers.

March 22, 2016
Bioenergy Blog
Energy Department Charting New Future for Wastewater Treatment

It will cost about $600 billion over the next 20 years to continue reliably transporting and treating wastewater, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Find out how the Department of Energy collaborated with the National Science Foundation and EPA to explore a smarter future for water treatment.

February 24, 2016
Researchers take laser-based velocity measurements at the Sandia National Laboratory's Combustion Research Facility. The measurements are used to help understand the flow features involved in the creation of in-cylinder carbon monoxide distributions in order to improve automotive diesel engines. | Photo by Randy Wong, Sandia National Laboratory
New Vehicle Initiative Aims to Make Fuel and Engines Work Together More Efficiently

Recently I had the pleasure of briefing members of Congress on EERE’s groundbreaking fuel-engine co-optimization initiative. The new, multi-year project combines previously independent areas of biofuels and engine combustion research and development (R&D) to design new fuels and engines that are co-optimized—designed in tandem to both maximize vehicle performance and carbon efficiency.

February 22, 2016
Bioenergy Blog
Federal Agencies Outline Bioeconomy Vision and Current Activities

This week at the Advanced Bioeconomy Leadership Conference, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Chief Scientist, Dr. Catherine Woteki, announced the release of the Federal Activities Report on the Bioeconomy. This report was developed to inform Americans of current federal agency activities that are helping to develop and support what we call the "bioeconomy"--an emerging part of the U.S. economy that relies on renewable biological resources to produce fuels, power, and bio-based products.

December 18, 2015
Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant | New York City Department of Environmental Protection
One Year Down the Road of Biogas Industry Development

Methane is both a powerful energy source and a potent greenhouse gas. When it’s extracted from the earth as natural gas and burned for heating and electricity, it emits carbon dioxide (CO2) but burns more cleanly than some other energy sources such as coal. However, when methane escapes into the atmosphere, it traps 25 times more heat radiation than CO2. That’s why some people are concerned with the environmental consequences of methane leaks during the process of fracking.

November 20, 2015
DuPont’s cellulosic ethanol biorefinery in Nevada, Iowa, opened on October 30, 2015. | Photo courtesy of DuPont
DuPont’s Cellulosic Ethanol Grand Opening Marks a Milestone for the Advanced Biofuels Industry

On a bright, crisp October morning in Iowa, I had the privilege to speak at the grand opening of DuPont’s cellulosic ethanol biorefinery—the fourth biorefinery of its kind in the United States and the largest in the world. This impressive plant is equipped to produce 30 million gallons of ethanol each year from the leftover stalks and leaves of the corn plant, called corn stover.

October 30, 2015
Bioenergy Blog
Night of the Living Trash: Bringing Your Waste Back to Life

This Halloween season, the U.S. Department of Energy’s  Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is highlighting how waste can be “brought back to life” and turned into something useful. On average, Americans generate over 200 million tons of waste per year, or nearly 4.38 pounds per person per day. Significant opportunity exists to convert this and other waste sources into liquid transportation fuels.

October 28, 2015
The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF), the Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER), and the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model are three tools that are enabling an environmentally beneficial biofuels industry.
Three Sustainability Tools are Enhancing Environmental Benefits of Biofuels

At the Energy Department’s Bioenergy Technologies Office, we’re actively working to develop the advanced biofuels industry in a way that leads to positive impacts and that demonstrates responsible stewardship of the environment. Biofuel production is closely tied to the environment—for example, energy crops can affect soil and water resources as well as wildlife populations, and water and energy are required to convert energy crops to fuel at a biorefinery.

October 27, 2015
Graphic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department.
Turn Your Halloween Pumpkins Into Power

It might not be long before the 1.3 billion pounds of pumpkins produced annually in the U.S. are as important for our energy security as they are for Halloween.

October 22, 2015
A tanker picks up gasoline from the biorefinery. | Photo courtesy The Gas Technology Institute
Woody Biomass Converted to Gasoline by Five-Company Team

An international consortium of five companies and organizations came together in a joint effort to transform woody biomass, including trees and wood waste, into a gasoline product suitable for use in today’s automobiles. The collaborative project was cost shared between the project participants and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) using funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

October 13, 2015
<i>Plastic water bottles are among the products that some companies are now producing with bio-based chemicals instead of fossil fuels. The Energy Department’s Bioenergy Technologies Office is researching ways that bioproducts can improve the economics of new types of biofuels. | Photo courtesy of Quinn Dombrowski, Flickr creative commons license.</i>
Plant Products a Growing Research Area

For every barrel of crude oil used in the United States, 16% goes toward making products ranging from everyday plastics to specialty chemicals in addition to making liquid fuels. From deli containers to industrial lubricants, these chemicals and products are a crucial, yet almost invisible part of our daily lives.

September 24, 2015
A team of high school students designed this infographic about cellulosic ethanol. View the entire infographic from the <a href="http://energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergizeme-infographic-challenge-cellulosic-ethanol">Bioenergy Technologies Office website</a>.
Students Recognized in Washington, D.C. for their Winning Bioenergy Infographic

A team of five freshmen from Williamsburg High School for Architecture and Design in Brooklyn, New York—designed an infographic on the benefits of cellulosic ethanol and were invited as guests to the eight annual conference, Bioenergy 2015, in Washington, D.C.

August 13, 2015
Molecular biologist Dr. Amanda Barry at Los Alamos National Laboratory's environmental photobioreactor matrix, which simulates microalgal biofuel pond conditions. <a href="/node/1143116">Algal biofuels have big potential</a> for America's clean energy future. | <a href="https://www.lanl.gov/">Los Alamos National Laboratory</a> photo
8 Questions for a Scientist: Molecular Biologist Dr. Amanda Barry

We chatted with one of the Energy Department's leading molecular biologists, Dr. Amanda Barry, who is working to create biofuels from algae at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

July 29, 2015
3 Reasons We’re Closer to an Algae Future than You Think

Algae shows great potential as a homegrown and renewable fuel source. Here's why it will be a big part of our nation’s energy mix sooner than you might expect.