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Women @ Energy: Susannah Green Tringe

March 15, 2013 - 5:27pm

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Susannah Green Tringe, Ph.D, is the Metagenome Program Lead at DOE’s Joint Genome Institute at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Susannah Green Tringe, Ph.D, is the Metagenome Program Lead at DOE’s Joint Genome Institute at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Susannah Green Tringe, Ph.D, is the Metagenome Program Lead at DOE’s Joint Genome Institute at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She holds an AB in Physics from Harvard and a PhD in Biophysics from Stanford. After her first postdoc in a yeast genetics lab at the University of New Mexico, Dr. Tringe joined Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Dr. Edward Rubin's lab as a postdoc in 2003. He convinced her to work in the then-unheard-of discipline of metagenomics, which has since grown into a major field of research. She now leads the Metagenome Program at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, a user facility devoted to sequence-based science in support of the DOE mission.

1) What inspires you to work in STEM?

I've always loved science and enjoy discovering and understanding new things.

2)  What excites you about your work at the Energy Department/Berkeley Lab?

Our work at Berkeley lab is exciting to me because it is not only fascinating fundamental science, but has a focused mission to increase energy independence and protect our global climate. I also enjoy the team science atmosphere, which allows us to work collaboratively to tackle big questions.

3) How can our country engage more women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in STEM?

I think it's important to expose kids to science and scientists early, so they're comfortable thinking about science as something they can do. I also think labs and universities could do more to make scientific careers compatible with raising a family, which would benefit all young scientists and reduce attrition.

4) Do you have tips you would recommend for someone looking to enter your field of work?

Always be willing to try something new. Science changes fast, so it's good to pick up as many skills and as much knowledge as you can along the way.

5) When you have free time, what are your hobbies?

I love to run or take my kids hiking in the Walnut Creek open space whenever I can.

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