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Women @ Energy: Emilie Hogan

July 18, 2014 - 4:28pm

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Dr. Emilie Hogan is a Computational Mathematics Scientist in the Computational Mathematics group at PNNL. She graduated from Rutgers University in May 2011 with a doctorate in Mathematics.

Dr. Emilie Hogan is a Computational Mathematics Scientist in the Computational Mathematics group at PNNL. She graduated from Rutgers University in May 2011 with a doctorate in Mathematics.

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Dr. Emilie Hogan is a Computational Mathematics Scientist in the Computational Mathematics group at PNNL. She graduated from Rutgers University in May 2011 with a doctorate in Mathematics. Her PhD research was in creating an algorithm to prove global asymptotic stability of rational difference equations.

Her current research is in applications of discrete mathematics to cybersecurity, power grid, knowledge systems, and computational chemistry. In all of these research areas she is applying order theory and graph theory, to solve various real world problems.

1) What inspired you to work in STEM?

I had great high school math teachers that helped me to embrace my love of math. And my grandpa was a mathematician so from a young age I was doing math problems with him. I initially wanted to be a high school math teacher but quickly realized that I was more excited by the math classes so just went for that.

2) What excites you about your work at the Energy Department?

It’s exciting that I get to do what I love (mathematics) but at the same time work on applications where I can see a difference being made. I work on problems that can have immediate real-world actions.

3) How can our country engage more women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in STEM?

I think that if more women went out to schools to do outreach and show the younger generation of girls and underrepresented groups that they wouldn’t be alone, we could get more of them engaged. People always talk about the fact that there are so few women in STEM fields, and that is true to an extent, but there are a bunch of us (there’s just more men). If that fact was more emphasized, that there are plenty of women, then girls wouldn’t be afraid that they would be alone in their field.

4) Do you have tips you’d recommend for someone looking to enter your field of work?

I think doing an internship in the field is an awesome idea. I did an internship as both an undergrad and as a grad student and it helped me immensely once I got to my postdoc and then my staff position. Seeing the “real world” before having to be in it gives you a good taste of what it will be like. Other than that, I think take a wide range of classes in college – make sure that you don’t have a narrow expertise, so you will be more valuable to the company.

5) When you have free time, what are your hobbies?

Skiing, canoeing, hiking, camping, going to fairs and festivals in the summer, biking by the river – and doing all of these things with a close group of friends.

 

 

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