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January 10, 2014
Wind energy is one of the world's fast-growing energy sources -- and many of the regions that could benefit from wind energy happen to be in cold climates.

Since 2005, scientists at GE Global Research have been researching, developing and testing materials in freezing conditions. By developing more efficient materials for wind turbines, researchers can increase turbine efficiency and reduce potential downtime for wind turbines in cold climates.

The teams use Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Titan, the world's most powerful supercomputer, to simulate hundreds of water droplets as they freeze, with each droplet containing one million molecules. By simulating and studying how water freezes on a molecular level, scientists are gaining an understanding of how ice forms, which will help them design better, more efficient materials for these colder climates. Pictured here is an illustration of a single water droplet, filled with molecules freezing in slow motion. <a href="https://www.olcf.ornl.gov/2013/10/25/titan-propels-ge-wind-turbine-research-into-new-territory/" target=_blank">Learn more about their research here</a>. | Photo/visualization courtesy of M. Matheson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
Photo of the Week: Cold as Ice — Using Titan to Build More Efficient Wind Turbines

Check out our favorite energy-related photos!

January 9, 2014
Photo credit: iStock.
New Steps to Strengthen the Nation’s Energy Infrastructure

Today President Obama formally launched the Quadrennial Energy Review, a path toward more reliable, secure and environmentally sound production, transmission and consumption of energy in the U.S.

January 8, 2014
This 3-D rendering of a lysozyme molecule shows two gadolinium atoms bound to it. Researchers soaked lysozyme crystals in a solution containing the metal gadolinium to help improve imaging quality in an experiment at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser. The experiment proved that LCLS can resolve the lysozyme structure without using data obtained earlier, and researchers hope to use similar techniques to reconstruct important unsolved proteins. | Photo credit: Max Planck Society.
Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions

Learn how researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory solve complicated structures using X-ray savvy and serious computing power.

January 7, 2014
These solar power collection dishes at Sandia National Labs' National Solar Thermal Test Facility are capable of some of the highest solar to electricity conversion. In January 2008, this technology set a new solar-to-grid system conversion efficiency record of 31.25 percent net efficiency rate; the technology is still available to benefit the U.S. by delivering power at all hours of the day by implementing thermal energy storage. CSP with storage provides important benefits to integrate more renewable energy to our electric power supply by mitigating resource variability and satisfying peak demand after sunset.  | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories.
In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs

This month on energy.gov, we'll be featuring clean energy technologies developed at the Energy Department's National Labs.

January 6, 2014
The Clean Energy Economy in Three Charts

Over the last five years, American inventors and investors have made significant progress in developing and deploying key clean energy technologies -- supported by Energy Department policies.

January 3, 2014
Our Best Energy Videos of 2013

Check out our best videos from 2013 -- from Secretary Moniz's first day on the job, to the rivalry between Edison and Tesla, to a visit to a solar-powered classroom.

January 2, 2014
Best of 2013: Our Favorites from Photo of the Week

From Albuquerque to Antarctica, we're geeking out over some of the coolest science photos we've ever seen.

January 2, 2014
Looking for ways to save energy? Check out these tips that every homeowner should try. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Updated January 2, 2014.
Resolve to Save Energy This Year

Instead of making a New Year's resolution, this year make a home energy efficiency resolution. For the second year in a row, we are sharing our top 8 tips to save energy and money at home.

December 31, 2013
Take a look back at 2013 with the most popular blog posts on Energy.gov.
The Year on Energy.gov: Our Most Popular Posts of 2013

Solar power, zombie replicants and the Super Bowl all are featured in our top blog posts of 2013.

December 27, 2013
Both!

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large research device located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NIF uses powerful lasers to heat and compress hydrogen fuel to the point where nuclear fusion reactions take place. It is currently the largest and most energetic inertial confinement fusion device in the world. Researchers use the NIF to ensure the safety of nuclear weapons, explore the potential of fusion as a safe energy source, and understand how the universe was created.
 
In this photo, NIF Team members Bruno Van Wonterghem (left), Jim Nally (pointing) and Rod Saunders watch through a newly installed viewing window, which allows the NIF team and visitors to see inside the chamber while it is vacuum-sealed for experiments.
 
Fun fact: NIF was also used as the set for the starship Enterprise’s warp core in the movie Star Trek Into Darkness. <a href="https://lasers.llnl.gov/" target="_blank">Learn more about the NIF</a>. | Photo courtesy of Jacqueline McBride, LLNL.
Photo of the Week: Real-Life Laser Device or Star Trek Set?

Check out our favorite energy-related photos!