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#WomenInSTEM: A Physicist Focuses on Scientific Advancement

July 17, 2014 - 4:59pm

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How Angela Capece got her start as a physicist at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. | Video by Matty Greene.

Meet Dr. Angela Capece. She is an associate research physicist at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), one of the Energy Department's 17 National Labs. Her research at PPPL focuses on plasma-surface interactions, the processes occurring at the interface between plasma and materials in fusion devices.

Dr. Capece first became interested in science after learning about NASA's Voyager missions at an early age. She grew up watching her older female cousins pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields, which encouraged her to take math and science seriously. In high school, Dr. Capece had great math and science teachers, who provided her with the support and confidence she needed to pursue a career in science. In this video, Dr. Capece provides advice for women and girls interested in pursuing careers in STEM fields, like focusing on physics, biology and chemistry at the high school level.

At the Energy Department, a workforce well-versed in STEM fields is critical to driving our mission forward. Through scholarships, fellowships and targeted initiatives, we’re working every day to boost the participation of underrepresented groups in STEM and energy fields -- including the launch of #WomeninSTEM. This video series is designed to inspire the next generation of STEM professionals, while raising the profile of women who are leading transformative change across the energy sector, from addressing the growing threat of climate change to advancing clean energy technologies, like wind and solar.

Watch the video above to learn more about Dr. Capece’s story. Share your feedback and suggest profiles and STEM professions to focus on for future videos on social media using #WomenInSTEM or by sending an email to newmedia@hq.doe.gov.

 

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