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What We Talked About with the White House "Entrepreneur-in-Residence”

April 20, 2012 - 1:42pm


Want more information on Apps for Energy? Signup at | Image by Hantz Leger.

Want more information on Apps for Energy? Signup at | Image by Hantz Leger.

We recently held a live Apps for Energy Twitter Q&A with Todd Park, U.S. Chief Technology Officer and “tech entrepreneur-in-residence” at the White House. During the live chat, Todd answered questions on a variety of Apps for Energy related topics -- from Green Button to open innovation. Here are a couple highlights from the discussion.

Competitions like Apps for Energy Help Spur Innovation and Out-of-the-box Thinking

Across the board, agencies are increasingly using prizes and competitions to spur innovation, solve tough problems, and advance core missions (for more details on prizes, check out this open innovation report from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy). Innovation is a key driving factor of the Apps for Energy competition -- tapping into the developer community to build apps that help Americans save energy and money in new and creative ways.  

Green Button’s Open Data Standard Presents a Huge Opportunity for Developers

With the launch of Green Button, millions of consumers can now download their electricity usage data -- all with a simple click of the mouse. So far, 15 utilities have committed to providing more than 27 million Americans with Green Button data. This presents a huge opportunity for developers to make a significant impact -- leveraging Green Button’s open standard data to build apps that impact the way Americans think about and use their utility data.

Your Input Is a Critical Part of the Green Button Evolution

Since the launch of Apps for Energy, we’ve received so many great insights from developers on Green Button functionality. As you continue to share your thoughts on improving and expanding Green Button capabilities for software applications, know that utilities, regulators and other key stakeholders are listening. For example, many of you have requested the capability to pull Green Button data for users via a web service, and now several utilities are expected to offer this service later this year. Your perspectives will continue to play a critical role in Green Button’s evolution.

Thanks again to all who participated in the Apps for Energy Twitter Q&A with thoughtful comments and questions. Join us in continuing the conversation by signing up at our Apps for Energy challenge page.